William Walker - American Adventurer

In: Historical Events

Submitted By GoKings57
Words 3633
Pages 15
William Walker - American Adventurer

Prepared for

Dr. Angelo Montante
University of La Verne
Point Mugu, CA 93042

Prepared By

Verna Tipton
History 311
University of La Verne

December 7, 1998

Table of Contents

I. Introduction Pages 1-2

II. His Life Pages 3-10

III. Conclusion Pages 11-12

IV. Bibliography

Introduction “…that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.” (Monroe, P. 1) The Monroe Doctrine stated that the United States would not tolerate European interference in the affairs of state of governments in the Western Hemisphere, and marked the beginning of American imperialism. What the Monroe Doctrine didn’t talk about, however, was the interference of American governments in the affairs of their neighbors. An early example of indifference to this type of interference was when Texas waged war to secede from Mexico. Many Texans were U.S. citizens who had settled in the vast Texas plains. Following the Battle of San Jacinto in 1836, Texas was granted sovereignty by the Mexican government, and immediately recognized by the American government. For several years, soldiers from the Republic of Texas, under orders from successive Texan Presidents Lamar and Houston, made forays into Mexico, seeking to expand their territorial gains. Conversely, in 1842, Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna swore to recapture Texas and plant Mexico’s “eagle standards on the banks of the Sabine.” (Stevens, P. 1) Santa Anna ordered his troops to make various raids on Texas soil. In neither of these instances did the United States government attempt to intervene. “…..in a spirit of hostile interference against us, for the avowed object of thwarting…...

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