What Did Louis Xiv Hope to Accomplish in His Domestic and Foreign Policies in France?

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What did Louis XIV hope to accomplish in his domestic and foreign policies in France?
Louis XIV’s domestic policy was to transform France. Louis XIV built on Louis XIII’s policy of extending absolute royal rule (centralised absolutism) to all parts of the kingdom. A. Aided by politicians such as Jean-Baptiste Colbert, and more especially, Jules Mazarin, Louis stamped his rule on his kingdom. It was Louis who had said “L’état, c’est moi.” (I am the state) and few doubted that he meant it. B. Louis ensured that the legal system of France was modernised. In fact, what he introduced was used in France to the time of the Napoleonic reforms. Civil law was reformed in 1667; criminal law was reformed in 1670; a Maritime Code was introduced in 1672 and a Commercial Code in 1673. C. To enforce his rule, Louis needed a large army. By the time of his death in 1715, the army of France stood at 350,000. Not only was it large in size, but it was also a modern army completely controlled by the state. Such an army ensured that the people were well controlled within France. Any hint of rebellion could be suitably dealt with. The army was answerable to the Secretary of State for War and the Intendants who worked for him. D. The credit for finding the modern French Navy went to Jean-Baptiste Colbert. In 1643, at the start of Louis’s reign, France had about three serviceable naval boats. For Colbert, this represented a weakness that other nations might exploit. Therefore, a great deal of time and effort went into developing a modern navy. This allowed France to follow an aggressive expansionist policy in both colonisation and commerce. Both added to the wealth and prestige of France. E. The economy relatively prospered in the early years of Louis’ reign. Under the guidance of Colbert, the French economy did well. Colbert realised the importance of a sound commercial…...

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