Urban Crime Aeras

In: Social Issues

Submitted By hwouhh
Words 1037
Pages 5
Urban Crime Areas: Part I
Author(s): Calvin F. Schmid
Source: American Sociological Review, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Aug., 1960), pp. 527-542
Published by: American Sociological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2092937
Accessed: 29-02-2016 05:28 UTC
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URBAN CRIME AREAS: PART I*

CALVIN F. SCHMID

University of Washington

The major objective of this paper is to describe with a high degree of specificity the more

significant economic, demographic and social determinants, and dimensions of crime areas

in a large urban community. The basic data include two series of crime statistics, "offenses

known to the police" and "arrests," totaling over 65,000 cases, along with detailed economic,

demographic, and social statistics from the 1950 decennial census. A 38 x 38 correlation

matrix, based on 20 crime indices…...

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