Tokyo

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Submitted By malsgeethi
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Financial Accounting Concerns

1. Tokyo AFM recognized premium revenue at the time it received the policyholder’s up-front cash payment. The company’s accountants argued that since the level of up-front payments received from policyholders had been stable over the last few years, this method was an appropriate reflection of economic reality.

For example, Fuji Computers entered into a five-year insurance contract with Tokyo AFM against earthquake damage to its headquarters building. As is customary, it paid the 100 million premiums for the five-year coverage up front in cash.

Question: How would you recognize revenues associated with this type of catastrophe insurance contract?

This case can be considered as premiums from short-duration insurance contracts, which are intended to cover expected claim costs resulting from insured events that occur during a fixed period of short duration. As of now the management is recognizing premium at the time it received policyholder’s up-front cash payment, but they should recognize the premium as earned revenue over time as the risk covered by the policy runs off. This is called a “deferral-matching approach”, as it attempts to defer recognition of any revenue or expense so that it can be matched with the timing of the incurred losses. Therefore, premiums from short-duration contracts are earned and recognized as earned revenue evenly as insurance protection is provided. In this case of Fuji computers the 100 million premiums being recognized as revenue evenly over the contract period of five years. I believe that up-front payment, are earned as services are delivered and/or performed over the term of the arrangement or the expected period of contract and premiums shall be recognized as earned revenue over the period of risk in proportion to the amount of insurance protection provided.

2. Tokyo AFM immediately…...

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