Thinkinh Logically

In: Business and Management

Submitted By megmeg09
Words 674
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Thinking Logically
Thinking logically is a vital part of critical thinking. When using logic, a person can make a decision based on the facts and not on his or her emotions. To reach a decision through logical thinking, both inductive and deductive reasoning can be used.
Inductive reasoning usually begins with a general observation about a person, thing, or event. From this observation someone draws a conclusion about other people, things, or events (cite book). Managers use inductive thinking in business. For example, a district manager may receive a report that shows that profit is down in a specific region. That manager may come to the conclusion that salespeople in that area are not working at capacity. Although this may be true, further research may show that there are other forces behind the profit loss in that region. For this reason, inductive reasoning can be both strong and weak.
Deductive thinking is reasoning that begins with two or more premises and derives a conclusion that must follow from those premises, a conclusion that is in fact contained or hidden in those premises (Kirby & Goodpaster, 2007). Deductive thinking is formed by using a syllogism. A syllogism is a sequence of three propositions such that the first two propositions imply the conclusion ("Syllogism," 2010). A syllogism contains three premises: major, minor, and conclusive. An example of a syllogism would be that all humans need food and water to survive. John is human. Therefore, John cannot survive without food and water. Deductive thinking is only accurate when the first two premises create a valid point (the conclusion). If management uses this type of thinking in business, the goal should be to create a syllogism that contains three premises that are all true.
Scientific
The scientific method of thinking is another important part of critical thinking. To use this mode…...

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