Theaetetus

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By dolm77
Words 31418
Pages 126
360 BC THEAETETUS by Plato translated by Benjamin Jowett
THEAETETUS

PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE: SOCRATES; THEODORUS; THEAETETUS
Euclid and Terpsion meet in front of Euclid's house in Megara; they enter the house, and the dialogue is read to them by a servant.

Euclid. Have you only just arrived from the country, Terpsion? Terpsion. No, I came some time ago: and I have been in the Agora looking for you, and wondering that I could not find you. Euc. But I was not in the city. Terp. Where then? Euc. As I was going down to the harbour, I met Theaetetus-he was being carried up to Athens from the army at Corinth. Terp. Was he alive or dead? Euc. He was scarcely alive, for he has been badly wounded; but he was suffering even more from the sickness which has broken out in the army. Terp. The dysentery, you mean? Euc. Yes. Terp. Alas! what a loss he will be! Euc. Yes, Terpsion, he is a noble fellow; only to-day I heard some people highly praising his behaviour in this very battle. Terp. No wonder; I should rather be surprised at hearing anything else of him. But why did he go on, instead of stopping at Megara? Euc. He wanted to get home: although I entreated and advised him to remain he would not listen to me; so I set him on his way, and turned back, and then I remembered what Socrates had said of him, and thought how remarkably this, like all his predictions, had been fulfilled. I believe that he had seen him a little before his own death, when Theaetetus was a youth, and he had a memorable conversation with him, which he repeated to me when I came to
Athens; he was full of admiration of his genius, and said that he would most certainly be a great man, if he lived. Terp. The prophecy has certainly been fulfilled;…...

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