The Austronesians

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Submitted By daveagustin29
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Austronesians The Austronesians or the Austronesian speaking people, as the Linguistics call them, came from Southern China then traveled south toward Daemon and then entered the Philippines through its northern most edge, Batanes. The Austronesians populated the archipelago for more than a thousand years (Batanes). After that, they traveled west toward Madagascar in Africa and east toward Easter Island near South America. Bellwood said that “The first Austronesian speaking Filipinos who arrived here four thousand years ago from Taiwan through Batanes and Northern Luzon came by boat. When they arrived here they also had to develop their methods of crossing sea by building canoes”. The Austronesians were believed to be expert seafarer and boat builders. They developed the technology to navigate and cross open seas to distant islands. They invented the outrigger canoe and the catamaran, this is type of boats used in travelling. Textbooks say that our ancestors reached the Philippines through land bridges but there is evidence that they came from Southern China using boat through Taiwan. The different boats were the instrument in the spread of the Austronesian languages through the Neolithic Era.
The Austronesians colonized the islands in Southeast Asia and the Pacific and imposed the language in their subjects. Today there are about 1200 languages considered part of the Austronesian family. Boats and the seas played the central role in the belief of Austronesian speaking people. They had their own belief. Weaving is believed to be a practice of the Austronesian. Their common cultural trait is the chewing of the betel nut. The Austronesians like to carry their ornaments from one place to another. Bellwood said that “They brought jade artifacts, like bracelets and earrings, from Taiwan and they were spreading them through the islands” Peter Bellwood led the team…...

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