Teachers: the Epitome of Pedagogy

In: Other Topics

Submitted By tahirfarida
Words 5214
Pages 21
Tahir Hussain Khan (Corresponding Author)
Academic Front Office,
COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad, Pakistan.
Tel: +92-333-520-5732, Email: tahir_khan@comsats.edu.pk

Farida Tahir
Department of Physics,
COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad, Pakistan.
Tel: +92-331-533-6900, Email: farida_tahir@comsats.edu.pk

Abstract

This study focuses on almost all factors, those if, found collectively in a teacher makes him a role model. Certain facts, endorsed through statistical surveys are also quoted. The paper highlights the fact that an ideal teacher is one who is a friend, a performer, an artist, a vocalist, a speaker, an analyst, a trainer, a guide, an anchorperson and a judge. Our research shows that the images of an ideal teacher remain fresh and green in the memory of students throughout their lives. The paper carries some suggestions and concludes that the blend of personal and professional qualities and didactic knowledge of the subject are valued key points. This study also set path for further and deeper discussion of images of a good teacher at all levels in general and at tertiary level in particular. Keywords: Role model, Quality Education, Lucidity, Evaluation, Instructional objectives

Teachers: The Epitome of Pedagogy

1. Introduction
Teachers are the architects of a nation. It is richness of teachers' talent that fabricates intellectual and academic architecture. It is the mosaic of talented teachers that would bring renewed vitality. Before we discuss the qualities of this constellation of educators, we have to address the query that why are the quality of a teacher important. Because good teaching leads to effective learning, which in turn means thorough and lasting acquisition of the knowledge. (How to improve teaching quality). Also, the Quality Education is a…...

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