Sociology Chapter Sumaries

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Chapter 6 - Inequality Based on Sexual Orientation
Essay Question - How do the various theoretical perspectives explain inequality based on sexual orientation? Summarize each perspective and then explain which one you find most compelling and why.
Gay, Lesbian, Transsexual, Queer, homosexual, heterosexual, bisexual they are all just different words for defining individuals.
Sexual behaviour whether heterosexual or homosexual is a learnt therefore the focus is on the development of the identity of which they identify themselves as gay, lesbian, bisexual or straight is the Interactionist perspective. It is assumed that most individuals define themselves as heterosexual because it is the established norm; therefore do not have to struggle over their identity. This thought of having a choice over identity should be disregarded. The individual is caught trying to define whom they are when subconsciously they already know. This theory is based on the journey that individuals take to define themselves. (Kendall, Nygaard, & Thompson, 2004)
The feminist perspective theory that has changed drastically over the last 4 decades. in the late 1960s and through the 1970s sexual orientation was debated by radical feminist and the oppression of women in society. Today feminist argue that
“Feminism asserts the right of all women to make their erotic choices, and this includes choosing men exclusively. Feminism also rejects the hierarchy of sexual practices, and do does not seek to substitute a lesbian priority for heterosexism. The goal of feminism in the area of sexuality is to establish true sexual pluralism, where no one choice is presented as ‘the norm’.” (Kendall et al., 2004, p.142)
In contradiction Queer theory is that northing is “normal” or “natural” therefore everything is arbitrary. Feminists dislike this due to the fact that it becomes difficult to invoke change…...

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