Smana and the Hog

In: English and Literature

Submitted By Purkin13
Words 341
Pages 2
2
Deal Cutting. Occasionally leaders are so desperate to resolve a problem that they make unethical or even illegal deals. Rather than holding an employee accountable to do the right thing, the boss turns a blind eye to an infraction, and then rewards the employee with an unofficial perk.
“I tell you what, you can do whatever you want this afternoon.
Just finish the job by noon.”
Implied in this deal is the following. “I know you’d finish on time if you put in any effort at all, but you’re not really trying.
I don’t want to deal with that right now, so I’ll let you loaf for four hours if you’ll only do what you’re supposed to do in the first place.”
Once you’ve cut this kind of deal, you’ve sold your soul. Since you’ve done something unethical, against policy, or illegal, the other person now “has the goods on you.” Leaders who’ve fallen into this trap have a horrible time regaining respect and control. They typically have to be transferred to a new area with new direct reports before they’re able to handle routine problems without having to offer an undeserved reward.
9
“February 14, 2 P.M.—Raised my right eyebrow three centimeters. Analyst nodded knowingly and reworked the calculations.”
Passing the Buck. Some leaders erroneously believe that they can play the role of “good cop.” All they have to do is turn their own boss into the “bad cop.” By being the “good guy,” they believe that they’re more likely to stay on civil terms with their direct reports. Here’s the kind of stunt they pull:
“I know you don’t want to stay late, but the big guy says if you don’t we’ll have to write you up. If I had my way, we’d all go home early for the holiday weekend.”
This strategy is disloyal, dishonest, and ineffective. Anyone with an IQ greater than that of a sea sponge can see through it.
Nothing undermines your authority more than blaming…...

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