Site-Report Cognitive Behavioral Interventions

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Site Report: Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions BSHS 311, Models of Effective Helping October 11, 2011 Site Report: Cognitive -Behavioral Interventions October is domestic violence awareness month; there is no need for a distinct month to be conscious of the frequency of domestic violence. Domestic violence is rampant across the nation. In this paper the subject to identify is the use of cognitive-behavioral practices within the setting of a woman’s shelter; known as “Turning Point.” The shelter mission is to provide programs and resources that enable victims/survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault to regain control of their lives (Turning Point, Inc., n.d.). Population Domestic and sexual violence is a global issue that does not discriminate culturally, socio-economically, race, gender, or age. Turning Point offers programs, shelter, and means for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. A domestic and sexual violence situation occurs when the abuser and the victim have an association, contrasting a stranger attack. Nearly 25% of surveyed women and 7.6% of surveyed men said that they were raped and/or physically assaulted by a current or former spouse, cohabitating partner, or date at some time in their lifetime. According to these estimates 1.5 million women are raped or physically assaulted by an intimate partner (US Department of Justice, 2000). Programs and Interventions Turning Point provides programs that address the origin of domestic violence and sexual assault. Turning Point offer services and interventions through the following: * 24-Hour Crisis Line-which provides assistance, information, and referrals from professionally trained interns 24 hours a day. *…...

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