Science Physics

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Submitted By yugioh
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Preparing for College Physics
David Murdock TTU October 11, 2000

2

Preface!
To the Instructors: This booklet is free. You may download, copy and distribute it as you wish. . . if you find it to be of any value. It can be gotten from the URL: http://iweb.tntech.edu/murdock/books/PreSci.pdf so you will need the (equally free) Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it and print it. This piece of software is on many institutional computer systems, and if you don’t have it on your machine, go get it at http://w1000.mv.us.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html The pages are in a format which looks best when printed double-sided. I’m giving it away to anyone in the same situation as me: You have many students in your introductory science courses who don’t have adequate preparation in basic mathematics, and you want to give them something simple and friendly to read. Preferably something that gets right to the point and which costs no more than the paper it’s printed on. I didn’t know where I could get a document like this, so I wrote one. You’ll notice that “significant figures” have not been rigidly observed in the numerical examples. That’s because this book is directed at students who need help in getting any correct numbers to round off. If you find this booklet to be useful or else worth exactly what it costs and/or have any suggestions, please write to me at murdock@tntech.edu

To the Students: Your college science courses may very well require you to do some mathematics (algebra, trig) and some work with a scientific calculator. You may not have been warned about this when you wrote that check for your tuition, but it’s too late now! Bwaahh-hah-Haah! . i

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PREFACE!

In this booklet I’ve tried to pick out the bits of your math courses that you will really need to get through your first courses in physics and chemistry. In addition, I give some directions on…...

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