Rbi Grade B

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Nikhilyadav2006
Words 9369
Pages 38
RESERVE BANK OF INDIA SERVICES BOARD, MUMBAI
Advt. No. 3A/2015-16

(This advertisement and the link to apply Online can be accessed on RBI Website www.rbi.org.in)
1. Applications (App.) are invited for the post mentioned below in Reserve Bank of India
(RBI/Bank) from Indian citizens, citizens of Nepal and subjects of Bhutan, persons of
Indian origin who have migrated from Myanmar and Sri Lanka with the intention of permanently settling in India and in whose favour Eligibility Certificates have been issued by Government of India.
Post
Number of Vacancies
Unreserved Scheduled Scheduled
Other
TOTAL
i.e., General
Castes
Tribes
Backward
(GEN/UR)
(SC)
(ST)
Classes
(OBC)#
Officers in Grade ‘B’
(General) Direct
67
15
13
39
134*
Recruitment - (DR)
#Candidates belonging to OBC category but coming in the ‘Creamy Layer’ are not entitled to OBC reservation. They should indicate their category as ‘General (GEN)’.
*Out of 134 vacancies mentioned above, 04 vacancies are reserved for candidates belonging to Persons with Disability (PWD) category - one vacancy each for Visually
Handicapped (VH), Orthopedically Handicapped (OH), and two vacancies for Hearing
Impaired (HI). Persons with Disability may belong to any category - GEN/SC/ST/OBC.
Note for PWD candidates:
(1) The degree of disability should be (i) Minimum 40% in case of Orthopedically Handicapped persons, (ii) Minimum 40% in case of Hearing Impaired- sense of hearing is non-functional for ordinary purposes of life; do not hear, understand sounds at all even with amplified speech; hearing loss more than 60 decibels in the better ear (profound impairment) or total loss of hearing in both ears, and (iii) For Visually Handicapped candidates either of the following conditions should be fullfilled:
a. Total absence of sight.
b. With visual acuity not exceeding 6/60 or 20/200 (Snellen) in…...

Similar Documents

Rbi Rules on Asset Liability Management

...rational assumptions about the way in which assets and liabilities would behave in other branches. In respect of foreign exchange, investment portfolio and money market operations, in view of the centralised nature of the functions, it would be much easier to collect reliable information. The data and assumptions can then be refined over time as the bank management gain experience of conducting business within an ALM framework. The spread of computerisation will also help banks in accessing data. 5. ALM organisation 5.1 a) The Board should have overall responsibility for management of risks and should decide the risk management policy of the bank and set limits for liquidity, interest rate, foreign exchange and equity price risks. b) The Asset - Liability Committee (ALCO) consisting of the bank's senior management including CEO should be responsible for ensuring adherence to the limits set by the Board as well as for deciding the business strategy of the bank (on the assets and liabilities sides) in line with the bank's budget and decided risk management objectives. c) The ALM desk consisting of operating staff should be responsible for analysing, monitoring and reporting the risk profiles to the ALCO. The staff should also prepare forecasts (simulations) showing the effects of various possible changes in market conditions related to the balance sheet and recommend the action needed to adhere to bank's internal limits. 5.2 The ALCO is a decision making unit......

Words: 4813 - Pages: 20

Grades

...Grades in the realm of education are standardized measurements of varying levels of comprehension within a subject area. Grades can be assigned in letters (for example, A, B, C, D, or F), as a range (for example 4.0–1.0), as a number out of a possible total (for example out of 20 or 100), as descriptors (excellent, great, satisfactory, needs improvement), in percentages, or, as is common in some post-secondary institutions in some countries, as a Grade Point Average (GPA). GPA is calculated by taking the number of grade points a student earned in a given period of time divided by the total number of credits taken.[1] The GPA can be used by potential employers or further post-secondary institutions to assess and compare applicants. A Cumulative Grade Point Average is a calculation of the average of all of a student's grades for all semesters and courses completed up to a given academic term,[2][3][4] whereas the GPA may only refer to one term. Keith Hoskin argues that the concept of grading students' work quantitatively was developed by a tutor named William Farish and first implemented by the University of Cambridge in 1792.[5] Hoskin's assertion has been questioned by Christopher Stray, who finds the evidence for Farish as the inventor of the numerical mark to be unpersuasive.[6] Stray's article elucidates the complex relationship between the mode of examination (testing), in this case oral or written, and the varying philosophies of education these modes imply, both to......

Words: 4251 - Pages: 18

Rbi Policy

...RBI CREDIT POLICY announced on 03.05.2013 Monetary and Liquidity Measures Based on an assessment of the current macroeconomic situation, it has been decided to: • reduce the policy repo rate under the liquidity adjustment facility (LAF) by 25 basis points from 7.75 per cent to 7.5 per cent with immediate effect; Consequently, the reverse repo rate under the LAF stands adjusted to 6.5 per cent and the marginal standing facility (MSF) rate and the Bank Rate to 8.5 per cent with immediate effect. Introduction 2. Since the Reserve Bank’s Third Quarter Review (TQR) of January 2013, global financial market conditions have improved, but global economic activity has weakened. On the domestic front too, growth has decelerated significantly, even as inflation remains at a level which is not conducive for sustained economic growth. Although there has been notable softening of non-food manufactured products inflation, food inflation remains high, driving a wedge between wholesale price and consumer price inflation, and is exacerbating the challenge for monetary management in anchoring inflationary expectations. Global Economy 3. Global economic developments over the last few months present a mixed picture. US GDP estimates for Q4 of 2012 indicate a tentative upturn on the back of improvement in housing and payroll employment. However, US macroeconomic prospects are clouded by the uncertainty surrounding the temporary appropriations and the debt ceiling. In the euro area,......

Words: 1557 - Pages: 7

Rbi Stress Testing

...or prolonged severe economic downturn) and the assessment of their impact on the bank’s financial position. Banks in India are beginning to use statistical models to measure and manage risks. Stress tests are, therefore, relevant for these banks. Further, the supervisory review process under Pillar 2 of Basel II framework is intended not only to ensure that banks have adequate capital to support all the risks in their business, but also to encourage banks to develop and use better risk management techniques in monitoring and managing their risks. RBI in notification dated 26/6/2007 has asked banks to put in place a Board approved ‘Stress Testing framework’ to suit their individual requirements which would integrate into their risk management systems. Framework requirements i. The Board approved ‘stress testing policy’ a) Frequency and procedure for identifying the principal risk factors which affect the bank’s portfolio; b) Methodology for constructing appropriate and plausible single factor and multi factor; c) Procedure for setting the stress tolerance limits; d) Process for monitoring the stress loss limits; e) Remedial actions required to be taken at the relevant stages; f) Authorities designated to activate the remedial actions; g) Need for identification of the responsibilities assigned to various levels/ functional units; h) Need for specification of reporting lines.   ii. Senior management should be actively involved in identifying the principal......

Words: 1416 - Pages: 6

Equities and Rbi

...New banking License and Financial Inclusion. The banking system in India has been constantly evolving with the government and the Reserve Bank of India (the RBI) making changes in the banking policies, as and when required. The RBI grants licenses to entities proposing to establish new banks and enter the industry, and also governs terms of the same. For nearly two decades, during 1970s – 1990s, no banks were allowed to be set up in the private sector. In 1993, consequent to liberalization of economy, the guidelines for licensing of new banks in the private sector were formulated for the very first time (1993 Guidelines) and the same were revised in 2001 (2001 Guidelines). The RBI has issued the revised guidelines for licensing of new banks in the private sector on 22 February 2013 (2013 Guidelines). Applications for grant of licenses under the 2013 Guidelines have to be submitted with the RBI by 1st July 2013, and once the license is granted, the banks have to be set up within one year of receipt of the in-principle approval. Under the 1993 Guidelines individuals, corporate groups and financial institutions were eligible to set up banks. This position was amended by the 2001 Guidelines so as to enable individuals and financial institutions to set up banks, large industrial houses being made ineligible to promote new banks. However, individual companies connected with large industrial houses could participate in the equity of a new private sector bank up to a maximum......

Words: 696 - Pages: 3

Grades

...Demand for more credits, community service, and better grades runs many high schoolers ragged. For many anything but the best is simply unexceptable. In a society that constantly tells it's youth they must have the highest pay check and newest car to be happy, why wouldn't this be the case? A fifth year of high school would give students more oppurtunity to take classes they would enjoy, take stress off of teenagers, and give the youth of our nation a chance to develop good priorities. Schools are always adding new and interesting courses, but for many, like the college bound student, there just isn't the time. Though an arts and crafts class might sound like fun, something like AP Music Theory would probably look better on a transcript. Since there is no time to take both the student will probably take the harder class even if it is just to keep up appearances. Fifteen years old seems to early to start making "career" choices over things that wold be fun. But it happens and it causes stress. Teenagers in the country have an ever growing load of stress being placed upon them. Starting before high school teens are faced with the questions: Where are you going to college? How are you going to get there? What are you going to be? All these questions are extremely daunting and often stress students out. Also, with the price of college so high many students take on a job during high school which only adds to the stress. With an extra year of high school not only would......

Words: 514 - Pages: 3

Analysis of Rbi

...RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI \ RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI RBI......

Words: 2013 - Pages: 9

Rbi Circular

...RBI/2014-15/3 Master Circular No. 12/ 2014-15 July 01, 2014 (Updated up to January 23, 2015) To All Authorised Dealer Category – I banks and Authorised banks Madam / Sir Master Circular on External Commercial Borrowings and Trade Credits External Commercial Borrowings and Trade Credits availed of by residents are governed by clause (d) of sub-section 3 of section 6 of the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999 read with Notification No. FEMA 3/ 2000-RB viz. Foreign Exchange Management (Borrowing or Lending in Foreign Exchange) Regulations, 2000, dated May 3, 2000, as amended from time to time. 2. This Master Circular consolidates the existing instructions on the subject of "External Commercial Borrowings and Trade Credits" at one place. The list of underlying circulars / notifications, consolidated in this Master Circular, is furnished in the Appendix. This Master Circular may be referred to for general guidance. The Authorised Persons and the Authorised Dealer Category – I banks may refer to respective circulars/ notifications for detailed information, if so needed. 3. This Master Circular is being updated from time to time as and when the fresh instructions are issued. The date up to which the Master Circular has been updated is suitably indicated. Yours faithfully (B P Kanungo) Principal Chief General Manager 1 Index PART I EXTERNAL COMMERCIAL BORROWINGS (ECB) I.(A) AUTOMATIC ROUTE i) Eligible Borrowers ii) Recognised Lenders iii)......

Words: 16256 - Pages: 66

Rbi Functions

...The central bank of the country is the Reserve Bank of India (RBI). It was established in April 1935 with a share capital of Rs. 5 crores on the basis of the recommendations of the Hilton Young Commission. The share capital was divided into shares of Rs. 100 each fully paid which was entirely owned by private shareholders in the begining. The Government held shares of nominal value of Rs. 2,20,000. Reserve Bank of India was nationalised in the year 1949. The general superintendence and direction of the Bank is entrusted to Central Board of Directors of 20 members, the Governor and four Deputy Governors, one Government official from the Ministry of Finance, ten nominated Directors by the Government to give representation to important elements in the economic life of the country, and four nominated Directors by the Central Government to represent the four local Boards with the headquarters at Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai and New Delhi. Local Boards consist of five members each Central Government appointed for a term of four years to represent territorial and economic interests and the interests of co-operative and indigenous banks. The Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934 was commenced on April 1, 1935. The Act, 1934 (II of 1934) provides the statutory basis of the functioning of the Bank. The Bank was constituted for the need of following: • To regulate the issue of banknotes • To maintain reserves with a view to securing monetary stability and • To operate the......

Words: 1946 - Pages: 8

Rbi Guidelines on Alm

...rational assumptions about the way in which assets and liabilities would behave in other branches. In respect of foreign exchange, investment portfolio and money market operations, in view of the centralised nature of the functions, it would be much easier to collect reliable information. The data and assumptions can then be refined over time as the bank management gain experience of conducting business within an ALM framework. The spread of computerisation will also help banks in accessing data. 5. ALM organisation 5.1 a) The Board should have overall responsibility for management of risks and should decide the risk management policy of the bank and set limits for liquidity, interest rate, foreign exchange and equity price risks. b) The Asset - Liability Committee (ALCO) consisting of the bank's senior management including CEO should be responsible for ensuring adherence to the limits set by the Board as well as for deciding the business strategy of the bank (on the assets and liabilities sides) in line with the bank's budget and decided risk management objectives. c) The ALM desk consisting of operating staff should be responsible for analysing, monitoring and reporting the risk profiles to the ALCO. The staff should also prepare forecasts (simulations) showing the effects of various possible changes in market conditions related to the balance sheet and recommend the action needed to adhere to bank's internal limits. 5.2 The ALCO is a decision making unit......

Words: 4819 - Pages: 20

Rbi Exposure Norms

...the Master Circular on Prudential Norms for Classification, Valuation and Operations of Investment Portfolio by Banks, as amended from time to time. Definitions Exposure Exposure shall include credit exposure (funded and non-funded credit limits) and investment exposure (including underwriting and similar commitments). The sanctioned limits or outstandings, whichever are higher, shall be reckoned for arriving at the exposure limit. However, in the case of fully drawn term loans, where there is no scope for re-drawal of any portion of the sanctioned limit, banks may reckon the outstanding as the exposure. Credit Exposure Credit exposure comprises the following elements: (a) all types of funded and non-funded credit limits. (b) facilities extended by way of equipment leasing, hire purchase finance and factoring services Investment Exposure a) Investment exposure comprises the following elements: (i) investments in shares and debentures of companies. (ii) investment in PSU bonds (iii)investments in Commercial Papers (CPs). Credit Exposure to Industry and certain Sectors Internal Exposure Limits Fixing of Sectoral Limits banks may also consider fixing internal limits for aggregate commitments to specific sectors, e.g. textiles, jute, tea, etc., so that the exposures are evenly spread over various sectors. These limits could be fixed by the banks having regard to the performance of different sectors and the risks perceived. The limits so fixed may......

Words: 4093 - Pages: 17

About Rbi

... RESERVE BANK OF INDIA (RBI) INTRODUCTION: The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) is the Central Bank of the country. It was established on April 1, 1935 in accordance with the provisions of the Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934. The Reserve Bank was started as share-holders bank with a paid-up capital of Rs.5 crores. On establishment it took over the function of management of currency from the Government of India and power of credit control from the Imperial Bank of India. The Central Office of the Reserve Bank was initially established in Calcutta but was permanently moved to Mumbai in 1937. The Central Office is where the Governor sits and where policies are formulated. Though originally privately owned, since nationalisation in 1949, the Reserve Bank is fully owned by the Government of India. PREAMBLE: The Preamble of the Reserve Bank of India describes the basic functions of the Reserve Bank as: "...to regulate the issue of Bank Notes and keeping of reserves with a view to securing monetary stability in India and generally to operate the currency and credit system of the country to its advantage." ORGANIZATION OF THE RESERVE BANK: 1. Central Board 2. Local Board 3. Board for Financial Supervision 4. Board for Payment and Settlement Systems 1. CENTRAL BOARD: The Reserve Bank's affairs are governed by a central board of directors. The board is appointed by the Government of India in keeping with the Reserve Bank of India Act. • Appointed/nominated...

Words: 2000 - Pages: 8

Rbi Functions

...Reserve Bank of India RESERVE BANK OF INDIA www.rbi.org.in ž¸¸£·¸ú¡¸ ¹£ö¸¨¸Ä ¤Îˆ RBI Central Office Building, Mumbai RESERVE BANK OF INDIA www.rbi.org.in ž¸¸£·¸ú¡¸ ¹£ö¸¨¸Ä ¤Îˆ 2 Contents Overview: Who We Are � Celebrating Our Platinum Jubilee � The Reserve Bank: Tradition and Change � Celebrating 75 years: Highlights Organisation and Structure: How We Operate � Management and Structure Main Activities: What We Do � Monetary Authority � Issuer of Currency � Banker and Debt Manager to Government � Banker to Banks � Regulator of the Banking System � Manager of Foreign Exchange � Regulator and Supervisor of the Payment and Settlement Systems � Developmental Role Research, Data and Knowledge Sharing: How We Communicate � Communicating with the Public � RBI Publications Addressing Current and Future Challenges Customer Service: How Can We Help You? 3 4 5 6 8 9 11 12 15 18 20 22 24 26 28 31 32 33 34 36 Overview: Who We Are The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) is the nation’s central bank Since 1935, when we began operations, we have stood at the centre of India’s financial system, with a fundamental commitment to maintaining the nation’s monetary and financial stability. 3 From ensuring stability of interest and exchange rates to providing liquidity and an adequate supply of currency and credit for the real sector; from ensuring bank penetration and safety of depositors’ funds to promoting and developing financial institutions and markets,......

Words: 6885 - Pages: 28

Rbi Report

...central bank money slowed the rapid spread of contagion. Among these three aspects of liquidity, each is relevant from the financial stability point of view as they are interconnected. However, from the banks’ point of view, funding liquidity is the most important as the crisis begins with a funding liquidity risk event in one or two institutions and if persistent across financial institutions spreads through contagion to affect market liquidity of assets and transforms into systemic liquidity shortage. In financial markets, institutions are interlinked with each other through lending/borrowing relationships to create chains. For instance, an institution A might be lending to B which in turn lends to C. Funding relationship of this kind can get affected if C is in stress and is unable to repay B. In that case, B in turn might find it difficult to repay A, facilitating the spread of distress (contagion). However, this is a simplistic way in which contagion spreads. There are other channels through which it can spread. C might look to borrow by collateralizing its assets either through securitization or by way of a repo. If the stress is large enough, an excess supply of such assets in the market could lead to increase in hair cuts charged by a repo lender and/or increase in the repo rate. This behaviour would still amount to increase in funding stress. But C could start liquidating its assets when stress is higher and this would be the stage when funding liquidity leads to......

Words: 4934 - Pages: 20

Crr by Rbi, India

...as cash with themselves, but deposit such case with Reserve Bank of India (RBI) / currency chests, which is considered as  equivlanet to holding cash with RBI. This minimum ratio (that is the part of the total deposits  to be held as cash) is stipulated by the RBI and is known as the CRR or  Cash Reserve Ratio.  Thus, When a bank’s deposits increase by Rs100, and if the cash reserve ratio is 6%, the banks will have to hold additional Rs 6 with  RBI and Bank will be able to use only Rs 94 for investments and lending / credit purpose. Therefore,  higher the  ratio (i.e. CRR), the lower is the amount that banks will be able to  use for lending and investment.  This power of RBI to reduce the lendable amount by increasing the CRR,  makes it an instrument in the hands of a central bank through which it can control the amount that banks lend.  Thus, it is a tool used by RBI to control liquidity in the banking system.  Some non bankers also wrongly use CRR Ratio or CRR Rate instead of Cash Reserve Ratio ).Thus we can say that this serves duel purposes i.e.(a)  ensures that a portion of bank deposits is kept with RBI and is totally risk-free, (b) enables RBI to  control liquidity in the system, and thereby, inflation by tying the  hands of the banks in lending money. | ------------------------------------------------- In 2006, Ceiling rates of CRR were abolished and now RBI can decide CRR on its own. Also RBI pays no interest on these......

Words: 551 - Pages: 3