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Psychology Disorder

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Psychological Disorder

Psychological Disorder
Schizophrenia is perhaps one of the most recognized of psychological disorders. The name is familiar to most but very few of those people have a clear concept of how a person develops schizophrenia or the affects it has on a person’s life. A person with schizophrenia has a different view of society and the world around him. Every person goes through the human development process. The human development process can take a different path than most people when a psychological disorder is involved. In this report a look at the relationship between human development, socialization, and schizophrenia.
Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is defined as a psychological disorder where splitting of physic function occur (Pinel, 2007). The symptoms of schizophrenia include delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, and disorganized or catatonic behavior (Shiraev & Levy, 2010). Schizophrenia is found in about 1% of the world’s population and the symptoms seem to be the same in every culture. If a family member has schizophrenia there is a 10% greater chance for another family member to develop the disorder as well (US Government, 2009). Genetics therefore play a part in this disorder. The studies have shown that genes are responsible for the development of schizophrenia. There are theories that the gene important in the making of certain chemicals in the brain are not working properly. Abnormal levels of Dopamine are common in schizophrenic patients. There are also theories that link schizophrenia to the environment. Studies have shown that malnutrition before birth, problems during birth exposure to virus, and other not yet known psychosocial factors can all play a part in the development of schizophrenia (US Government, 2009). Studies have shown that enlarged cerebral ventricles or smaller cerebral cortex can…...

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