Privacy in the Workplace

In: Business and Management

Submitted By davidbell6
Words 1125
Pages 5
Explain where an employee can reasonably expect to have privacy in the workplace.

Privacy in the workplace is very hard to get. Advancements in technology have been made that allow companies to monitor every aspect of an employee use of their systems. This is very evident if you have a job that involves you to be on the telephones. Companies are able to listen to each phone that is made, see every website that you have visited and read any email you have received. For example, I used to work at AMEX call center, and they were able to monitor each call through a system called N.I.C.E.. Through this system the company was able to monitor my calls for quality control reasons. However, if I made a phone call for personal reasons they were also monitored because they let me know that every call is monitored and it was at my own risk to use their phones to make calls. Also while working on the computers at work they were able to see whatever I saw. Since the employer owns the computer network and the computers, he or she is free to use them to monitor employees. Employees are given some protection from computer and other forms of electronic monitoring under certain circumstances. As far as email goes there are also basically no restrictions to what an employer can do. If an electronic mail (e-mail) system is used at a company, the employer owns it and is allowed to review its contents. Messages sent within the company as well as those that are sent from your computer to another company or from another company to you can be subject to monitoring by your employer. This includes web-based email accounts such as Yahoo and Google mail as well as instant messages. From my experience it is very hard to have privacy in the workplace. There are also other instances where it may not be as hard. Like, if the person is in operations or a manager and have their own…...

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