Pressure Distribution Around a Cylinder

In: Computers and Technology

Submitted By Nuhash
Words 3736
Pages 15
PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION AROUND A
CYLINDER
DEN5242 – AEROTHERMODYNAMICS OF FLUID FLOWS

NAKIBUL HUSSAIN NUHASH
130760034

Contents
Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 2
Experimental Apparatus and Instrumentation ....................................................................................... 2
Experimental procedure ......................................................................................................................... 2
Calculations and Results ......................................................................................................................... 3
Discussion................................................................................................................................................ 7
Conclusion ............................................................................................................................................... 9
References .............................................................................................................................................. 9
Appendix ............................................................................................................................................... 10

Introduction
The purpose of the experiment is to determine the pressure distribution on the surface of a smooth cylinder placed with its axis perpendicular to the flow and to compare it with the distribution predicted for frictionless (inviscid) flow. Two tests are carried out on the cylinder to measure the pressure distribution, one for smooth (laminar) flow and one for turbulent flow. The difference between these two measured distribution and experimental distribution is going to be discussed. The tunnel calibration constant,…...

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