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Person Centred Approach

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By everegan
Words 1919
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PA theoretical exploration, both of the philosophy underpinning the Person-Centred Approach and of ‘the Approach in action in a psychotherapeutic context.

Introduction
Carl Rogers (1902 – 1987) is the pioneer of Person-Centred therapy. In this essay, I will discuss the approach, which revolved over 70 years of his life. His necessary and sufficient conditions which he said was all that was needed to self-actualize and become a fully functioning person. I will also talk about contributions from others and expansion of his theory and lastly, I will discuss the limitations of person-centred approach that may result in ineffective therapy.

Philosophy of person-centred approach
Carl Rogers developed person-centred therapy in the 1940s. He wanted to move away from therapist reliant to a therapeutic relationship where he had a more humanistic philosophy which is captured nicely by the metaphor of “how an acorn, if provided with the appropriate conditions will “automatically” grow in positive ways, pushed naturally towards its actualization as an oak.” Rogers was born in Illinois to a very strict religions family. He originally studied agriculture, then theology and finally psychology. Rogers approach was developed over four periods. The first being in the 1940s which saw the birth of “non-directive counselling”. Rogers became the leading figure in the third force of psychology known as the Humanistic psychology movement. His philosophy was that people are essentially all good and for the most part able to solve their own problems without direct intervention by the therapist. The therapist’s role is to provide a specific therapeutic climate in order for this change to occur. Thorne B (1992) sums this up nicely by saying “The person-centred counsellor believes that each individual has the potential to become a unique and beautiful creation but that none of…...

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