Patho Case Study

In: Science

Submitted By estanton
Words 526
Pages 3
What Is A Nurse?

A nurse is many things these days. Nurses play many roles in the healthcare setting. From a caregiver to a care manager, nurses are the heart and backbone to those who need medical attention. Not anyone person can be a nurse. It takes a special kind of person with traits that show sympathy, understanding, and positivity.

Bibliography
Arizona-Unknown, U. o. (Uknown). 6 Personality Traits of Successful Nurses.

Being a nurse means that you are a decision maker, caregiver, communicator, manager of care and a teacher to patients. Nurses are the ones who spends the most time with each individual and knows the most about them. As a nurse we must be able to multitask. Nurses have more than one patient which means that they are responsible for knowing each individual's history, treatment, and the things that make them unique from the next. Nurses must be able to handle pressure in times of trouble. Nurses must learn how to manage stress because if the nurse is stressed and flustered, then the patient may feed off that emotion. It is the nurses responsibility to be the advocate for patients. Doctors may or may not know the patient except by their charts. Nurses know all aspects of each individual and what makes them tick.

When asked what are the characteristics or traits of nurse there are so many things people can say. According to The University of Arizona, nurses should be tenacious gregarious, methodical, optimistic, patient, and empathetic. These traits are the main traits most nurses share and amongst each one are sub traits that further explain a nurse. One of the most important things is that a nurse should know their learnings very well. Nursing school is meant to teach us many things to become the best nurse possible. Every little thing that we are taught should be permanently instilled. The next most important trait is being able to…...

Similar Documents

Patho Unit 1 Case Study

...Being a 54 year old chronic alcoholic, having gastrointestinal bleeding/mental deterioration, and showing signs of cirrhosis, F.C. is in a very dangerous position. It is concerning that he was found to have a .18 BAC because this is a potentially fatal level of alcohol in the blood (Be Responsible About Drinking, 2013). Some common manifestations of alcoholic cirrhosis that F.C. may experience include weight loss, loss of appetite/energy, edema/ascites, mood changes, and jaundice (WebMD 2012). Of these symptoms, ascites and jaundice are both secondary from hepatocellular failure, and weight loss and ascites are also secondary symptoms to portal hypertension (Copstead, pgs. 756-759). Unfortunately, with cirrhosis and portal hypertension also typically comes gastric or esophageal varices. These varices are pathways that open up when portal pressure becomes too high in order to redirect the blood flow back to the heart. When these pressures rise and these varices open up, it leaves the lining beneath the mucosa very susceptible for rupture, leading to major bleeding. Since F.C. has already had several incidents with GI bleeding, he is at an even greater risk for re-bleeding (Copstead, pg. 761). F.C’s mental deterioration is most likely caused by a disorder called hepatic encephalopathy. When cirrhosis occurs, the parts of the liver cannot function the way that they are supposed to. Since once of the major jobs of the liver is to clean out, or “detox” the blood, this function...

Words: 545 - Pages: 3

Patho Case Study 1

...Berlin Herrera Unit 1 Case Study F.C. is a 54-year-old man with a history of chronic heavy alcohol use. He has frequent bouts of gastrointestinal bleeding for which he has been hospitalized on six separate occasions over the years. He continues to drink and exhibits most of the common manifestations of alcoholic cirrhosis. He was recently hit by a car and was hospitalized for a broken leg. He appeared to be under the influence of alcohol at the time of the accident and had a blood alcohol level of 0.18. F.C.’s family reports that his mental functioning has deteriorated significantly over the past few months.  Discussion Questions 1. What are the common manifestations of alcoholic cirrhosis? Which of these are secondary to hepatocellular failure? Which are secondary to portal hypertension? Common manifestations of alcoholic cirrhosis are as follows: * Jaundice: yellow pigmentation of the skin caused by hyperbilirubinemia. This condition is secondary to hepatocellular failure because the bilirubin metabolism becomes impaired due to malfunction of liver tissue. * Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis: acute bacterial infection of ascetic fluid caused by contamination of dialysate. This condition is considered secondary to portal hypertension because the normally, the fluid passes the portal vein into the liver to be killed off, but with a fluid back up, bacterial infection grows due to the increased fluid retention within the portal vein. * Hepatic......

Words: 764 - Pages: 4

Patho Case Study

...C.C. is a previously healthy 27-year-old man admitted to the critical care unit after an accident in which he was hit by a car and dragged along the pavement for nearly 100 feet. He suffered a frontal contusion, fractured clavicle and ribs, and extensive abrasions on his arms, legs, side, back, and buttocks. He was tachycardic, hypotensive, unresponsive, and ventilating poorly when admitted. He was placed on a mechanical ventilator and given IV fluids for shock. C.C. responded well to fluids, with an increase in blood pressure and an improvement in urine output. 1. Based on his case history and responsiveness to fluid therapy, what type of shock was C.C. experiencing? Hypovolemic shock 2. What other clinical findings would be helpful in confirming the type of shock? Capillary refill, tenting on skin turgor, pale skin due to perfusion, and may feel dizzy, faint, nauseated, or very thirsty. 3. Because of his many open wounds and invasive lines, C.C. is at risk for sepsis and septic shock. What clinical findings would suggest that this complication has developed? Bacteremia, high fevers, hot, flushed skin, elevated heart rate, hyperventilation, altered mental status, swelling, and low blood pressure 4. What is the link between sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)? Sepsis causes MODS because the inflammatory and anti-inflmammatory reactions in the body, which cause the clotting cascade to be more active. Resulting in multiple thrombi forming......

Words: 277 - Pages: 2

Patho Case Study

...This is the second case study that is required for the class. Please submit a paper (doesn’t have to be long; you could even give me bullet-point answers to the questions listed below) that answers all of the questions posed after Case Study 1. I have included an easy second case study which, if you complete it, will be worth extra credit. Answers to the first Case Study are worth 25 points and responding to Case Study 1 is required work for the course. The extra credit, which is not required, will be worth a total of 10 points. Both are due at the beginning of class on Tuesday, March 10, 2015. Case 1 R.S. has smoked for many years and has developed chronic bronchitis, a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He also has a history of coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial vascular disease. His arterial blood gas (ABG) values are pH = 7.32, PaCO2 = 60 mm Hg, PaO2 = 50 mm Hg, HCO3- = 30 mEq/L. His hematocrit is 52% with normal red cell indices. He is using an inhaled ß2 agonist and theophylline to manage his respiratory disease. At this clinic visit, it is noted on a chest x-ray that R.S. has an area of consolidation in his right lower lobe that is thought to be consistent with pneumonia. Discussion Questions 1. What clinical findings are likely in R.S. as a consequence of his COPD? How would these differ from those of emphysematous COPD? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is comprised primarily of two related diseases: Chronic......

Words: 1308 - Pages: 6

Patho Case Study 1

...E.O. is an 8-year-old girl with a history of asthma and allergy to bee stings. She has been brought to the clinic complaining of a throat infection. Her health care provider prescribes a course of penicillin to manage her current infection and cautions her parents to watch her closely for a reaction. Discussion Questions 1. What type of reaction is the health care provider concerned about and why? The type of reaction that the health care provider is concerned about is an allergic reaction to the penicillin. Since E.O is already allergic to bee stings and has a history of asthma, which are both Type I hypersensitivities, it is very likely that E.O could have an allergic reaction to the penicillin. Since penicillin is found in cow milk and the patient could have been exposed to it through milk, breast milk, or in utero, E.O could become sensitized to it. If E.O is further exposed to the allergen (being that her health care provider prescribed her penicillin), there could be an allergic reaction to it. Exposure to penicillin can result in the degranulation in mast cells and the release of histamine, which could cause the reaction, which is even more likely since E.O has two Type I hypersensitivities. 2. Explain the role of IgE and mast cells in type I hypersensitivity reactions. Why might E.O. react adversely to the antibiotic with the first use? During sensitization, IgE antibodies bind to the surface of mast cells, which makes the mast cells “sensitized.”...

Words: 297 - Pages: 2

Case Study

...certainly does not. When you can’t see eye to eye with your clients, it’s important to let go of your ego, and remain calm. Your disagreements may stem from the fact that you’re not communicating effectively. If you’ve offered your professional opinion to a client, and your opinion was ignored, take it with a grain of salt. [pic] Elements of Communication 1. APPROACH Timing of communication; choice of medium; tone and point of view (perspective, attitude, and relationship regarding audience, purpose, and material); recognition of audience (reader vs. writer orientation); direct vs. indirect presentation (ordering of evidence and conclusions); persuasive strategies and rhetorical appeals (logos, pathos, ethos) Checkpoints: □Timing and choice of medium are appropriate to the purpose, audience, and material. □Tone is appropriate to the purpose, audience, and material. □Material is made relevant to the reader (reader’s interests and concerns are recognized). □Conclusions are presented directly (conclusion first, evidence last) to a sympathetic audience, indirectly (evidence first, conclusion last) to an unsympathetic or hostile audience. □Persuasive strategy incorporates a mixture of rhetorical approaches (appeals to logic, feelings, and ethics or credibility). 2. DEVELOPMENT Organization (logical arrangement and sequence); evidence and support (relevance, specificity, accuracy and sufficiency of......

Words: 1688 - Pages: 7

Patho 1 Case Study

...After reading E.O’s chief complaint, we can deduce from the past medical history of bee string allergies and asthma that E.O responds to particular allergens with a undesirable hyperactive immune response. This oversensitivity is called type I hypersensitivity and is mediated by immunoglobulin E. (2) E.O visited the physician complaining of a throat inflammation/infection. The physician prescribed her penicillin but being aware of her undesirable cascade of immune responses, he is wary of another allergic reaction that is indeed worsened in patients with asthma. (7) The release of IgE results in binding to immune cells such as mast cells, lymphocytes, basophils..etc. (1) The bindings of IgE to these cells in high risk (asthmatic) patients are at increased risk for anaphylactic shock than those without pre-existing conditions. (4)(7) Unfortunately, penicillin is notorious for reactions such as anaphylactic shock and if the patient is taking it for the first time, symptoms may not show up until the body has formed antibodies and once exposed the second time, attack commences and unforeseen systemic symptoms occur. (6) IgE is one type of antibody produced by B cells and plasma cells that can be found binding tightly to mast cell receptors in the mucosal tissues where it acts as a receptor.(7) Once allergen or antigen has entered the patients system, IgE isotypes make plenty of IgE antibodies on the first exposure and these antibodies will bind to their designated mast cells......

Words: 426 - Pages: 2

Patho Case Study 1

...K.H. has been exposed to many risk factors associated with hypertension. Given the fact that he is of older age, K.H. is more at risk because the 1risk of high blood pressure increases as you age. High blood pressure is more common in males at his 2age. High blood pressure is particularly common among African-Americans, so the fact that K.H. is African American poses a higher risk. His heart rate is normal and the description does not indicate family history of hypertension, but it is noted that K.H is 30 pounds over his ideal weight. Persons who are overweight have a higher risk of developing hypertension. Due to the fact that K.H. has been placed on a salt restricted diet, it is safe to assume that he was consuming high amounts of sodium in his diet prior, which is a primary risk factor of hypertension. K.H.âs has a systolic pressure is 135 and the diastolic pressure is 96. This is stage 1 hypertension. The rationale for treating the patient with an ACE inhibitor is that Angiotensin II needs to be controlled because that is what ultimately is narrowing the blood vessels and causing the blood pressure to increase. An ACE inhibitor slows the production of Angiotensin II. The mechanism of action includes the modification of the production of Angiotensin II. This is a vasoconstrictor. Vasoconstriction is what leads to the elevation of B/P. Angiotensin II is made from angiotensin I through the means of the angiotensin converting enzyme. ACE inhibitors impede the activity of...

Words: 288 - Pages: 2

Patho Case Study 2

...1. What risk factors for primary hypertension are evident from K.H.’s history and physical data? K.H. is a 67 year old African American male, his ethnicity and age are non-modifiable risk factors, which means it is circumstances that he cannot change. Unfortunately African Americans are more susceptible to hypertension and after 55 years old there is a 90% chance that Americans regardless of ethnicity will develop hypertension. According to a PowerPoint from Dr. Marian, HSC 3211 on Hypertension, the ethnicities most likely to have hypertension are as follows: African American > Puerto Rican > Hispanic American > Caucasian > Cuban American. K.H. is also overweight by 30 pounds. Obesity is a leading cause of hypertension because excess weight makes it more difficult for the heart to pump blood throughout the body as efficiently as it would if K.H. was not overweight. He has already started lifestyle modifications such as a salt-restricted diet in hopes of lowering his blood pressure. Sodium causes the muscles around blood vessels to becomes stronger and thicker as a result of trying to ease the extra burden the arteries are experiencing. However, this is not a good thing because it causes the arteries to become more narrow thus raising one’s blood pressure even higher. With this evidence, it is important that K.H. stay on his salt-restricted diet if he hopes to lower his blood pressure and avoid other organ damage from excess salt. K.H. has high blood pressure at......

Words: 1035 - Pages: 5

Patho Case Study

...Signature Assignment: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Case Study Case Study R.S. has smoked for many years and has developed chronic bronchitis, a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He also has a history of coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial vascular disease. His arterial blood gas (ABG) values are pH = 7.32, PaCO2 = 60 mm Hg, PaO2= 50 mm Hg, HCO3- = 30 mEq/L. His hematocrit is 52% with normal red cell indices. He is using an inhaled ß2 agonist and Theophylline to manage his respiratory disease. At this clinic visit, it is noted on a chest x-ray that R.S. has an area of consolidation in his right lower lobe that is thought to be consistent with pneumonia 1) What clinical findings are likely in R.S. as a consequence of his COPD? 2) How would the consequences of the COPD of R.S. (identified in question 1) differ from those of emphysematous COPD? 3) Interpret R.S.’s laboratory results. How would his acid-base disorder be classified? What is the most likely cause of his polycythemia? 4) What is the rationale for treating R.S. with Theophylline and a ß2 agonist? 5) What effects would his respiratory disease have on his cardiovascular function? ANSWERS: 1) 1. And 2. He is likely to have diminished breath sounds. He may or may not have wheezing depending upon the degree of bronchoconstriction and will almost certainly have crackles and bronchial breath sounds over the RLL. Since he is polycythemic and has hypoxemia,......

Words: 742 - Pages: 3

Patho Case Study

...This is the second case study that is required for the class. Please submit a paper (doesn’t have to be long; you could even give me bullet-point answers to the questions listed below) that answers all of the questions posed after Case Study 1. I have included an easy second case study which, if you complete it, will be worth extra credit. Answers to the first Case Study are worth 25 points and responding to Case Study 1 is required work for the course. The extra credit, which is not required, will be worth a total of 10 points. Both are due at the beginning of class on Tuesday, March 10, 2015. Case 1 R.S. has smoked for many years and has developed chronic bronchitis, a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He also has a history of coronary artery disease and peripheral arterial vascular disease. His arterial blood gas (ABG) values are pH = 7.32, PaCO2 = 60 mm Hg, PaO2 = 50 mm Hg, HCO3- = 30 mEq/L. His hematocrit is 52% with normal red cell indices. He is using an inhaled ß2 agonist and theophylline to manage his respiratory disease. At this clinic visit, it is noted on a chest x-ray that R.S. has an area of consolidation in his right lower lobe that is thought to be consistent with pneumonia. Discussion Questions 1. What clinical findings are likely in R.S. as a consequence of his COPD? How would these differ from those of emphysematous COPD? Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is comprised primarily of two related diseases: Chronic......

Words: 337 - Pages: 2

Patho Hf Case Study

...clinical findings are likely to be present with this type of heart failure? Orthopnea, cough, crackles in the lungs, fatigue, oliguria, increased HR, confusion and anxiety What compensatory mechanisms are likely to be operative in A.O. to enhance cardiac output? Increased Heart Rate and LV EDV What is the most likely cause of A.O.’s pedal edema? Right Sided heart failure What is the cause of A.O.’s exertional chest pain? Stable Angina Case 2 Questions: C.C. is a previously healthy 27-year-old man admitted to the critical care unit after an accident in which he was hit by a car and dragged along the pavement for nearly 100 feet. He suffered a frontal contusion, fractured clavicle and ribs, and extensive abrasions on his arms, legs, side, back, and buttocks. He was tachycardic, hypotensive, unresponsive, and ventilating poorly when admitted. He was placed on a mechanical ventilator and given IV fluids for shock. C.C. responded well to fluids, with an increase in blood pressure and an improvement in urine output. 1. Based on his case history and responsiveness to fluid therapy, what type of shock was C.C. experiencing? Hypovolemic Shock 2. What other clinical findings would be helpful in confirming the type of shock? Low blood pressure, weak pulse, cyanosis of the lips and fingertips, shallow breathing 3. Because of his many open wounds and invasive lines, C.C. is at risk for sepsis and septic shock. What clinical findings would suggest that this complication has......

Words: 289 - Pages: 2

Patho Physiology Case Review

...Phys 261 2c Pathophysiology Case Reviews 1. The name of this respiratory disease is Cor Pulmonale, also called right sided heart failure. This is a disease in which hypertrophy and dilation of the right ventricle occur secondary to diseases affecting structure or function of the lungs or their vasculature. It can occur at the end stage of various chronic respiratory and respiratory control center diseases. Cor pulmonale doesn’t occur in disorders stemming from congenital heart defects or those that affect the left side of the heart. Causes include but are not limited to; bronchial asthma, vascular obstruction, high altitude, kyphoscoliosis, obesity, pectus excavatum, poliomyelitis, pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary embolism, and vasculitis. Symptoms of the disease include dyspnea at rest, weakened pulses due to decreased cardiac output, and neck vein distention. Treatment of Cor pulmonale has three main focuses, reducing hypoxemia and vasoconstriction, increasing exercise tolerance, and correcting underlying conditions when possible. 2. Croup is severe inflammation and obstruction of the upper airway, occurring as acute laryngo-tracheobronchitis, laryngitis, and acute spasmodic laryngitis. Croup usually results from viral infection. Viruses include; adenovirus, influenza, measles, parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus. Signs and symptoms include: inspiratory stridor, muffled vocal sounds, and a characteristic sharp barking or seal-like cough related to...

Words: 361 - Pages: 2

Patho Case Study

...Patho Case Study 1 E.O. is an 8-year-old girl with a history of asthma and allergy to bee stings. She has been brought to the clinic complaining of a throat infection. Her health care provider prescribes a course of penicillin to manage her current infection and cautions her parents to watch her closely for a reaction. Discussion Questions   1. What type of reaction is the health care provider concerned about and why? The type of reaction that the health care provider is concerned about is an allergic reaction to the penicillin.   Since E.O is already allergic to bee stings and has a history of asthma, which are both Type I hypersensitivities, it is very likely that E.O could have an allergic reaction to the penicillin.   Since penicillin is found in cow milk and the patient could have been exposed to it through milk, breast milk, or in utero, E.O could become sensitized to it.   If E.O is further exposed to the allergen (being that her health care provider prescribed her penicillin), there could be an allergic reaction to it.   Exposure to penicillin can result in the degranulation in mast cells and the release of histamine, which could cause the reaction, which is even more likely since E.O has two Type I hypersensitivities.      2. Explain the role of IgE and mast cells in type I hypersensitivity reactions. Why might E.O. react adversely to the antibiotic with the first use? During sensitization, IgE antibodies bind to the surface of mast cells, which makes the......

Words: 301 - Pages: 2

Case Study 1 for Patho 2

...Case Studies on Cardiac Function This is the first case study that is required for the class. Please submit a paper (doesn’t have to be long; you could even give me bullet-point answers to the questions listed below) that answers all of the questions posed after Case Study 1. I have included an easy second case study which, if you complete it, will be worth extra credit. Answers to the first Case Study are worth 25 points and responding to Case Study 1 is required work for the course. The extra credit, which is not required, will be worth a total of 10 points. Case 1 A.O. is an 89-year-old woman with a long history of systolic heart failure secondary to a large left ventricular infarct when she was in her 70s. She had poor activity tolerance and required assistance with activities of daily living. Even minimal activity was associated with moderately severe dyspnea and exertional chest pain, which was relieved by rest. A.O. also exhibited marked pedal edema bilaterally. She is being treated with digitalis, furosemide (Lasix), KCl, and sublingual nitroglycerin. Discussion Questions 1. Which type of heart failure (left or right sided) is usually associated with dyspnea? Left-sided heart failure is usually associated with dyspnea. What other clinical findings are likely to be present with left-sided heart failure? Other clinical findings that are likely to be present with left-sided heart failure include radiographic cardiomegaly, abnormal apical pulse......

Words: 1080 - Pages: 5