Nintendon't

In: Business and Management

Submitted By belz
Words 1905
Pages 8
Team 1 Company Analysis 1

Jackson Berry, Will Berman, Amanda Curtis, Jenny Zhang
Professor Belz
Case Studies in Innovation
March 3, 2016 NintenDON’T Nintendo captured many hearts and households in the late 1980s, and its legacy lives on through the games that made it the best­selling console of its time. Revolutionizing the world of video games, Nintendo survived the burst of the video game bubble through its storytelling across multiple game console platforms. Their products were conceived at the intersections of inexpensive hardware and unique, beloved storytelling in their games; this combination made their console a household staple. In an era of heartthrobs and fads, Nintendo rose above and surpassed a simple level of trendiness. The company defined gaming innovation: “to play
Nintendo” became synonymous with video gaming.
1983 saw the first recession in the video game industry in the form of the “Atari Shock,” after the market became too populated with so many different games and consoles. This caused an oversaturation of the console industry, which was already competing heavily with home computer games. Thus, the “Atari Shock” was a flooding of a market in which no player had a majority share, and the excess of third­party games resulted in decreased shelf space and decreased sales. People started believing video games were a fad, and amidst the chaos, the
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was born. Nintendo made purposeful branding decisions that defined their role in the industry for decades. They pivoted from a console company to an entertainment system company, focusing their vision on the experience of games as opposed to the medium. In order to do this Nintendo adopted a similar business strategy to Gillette. They began selling the consoles practically at cost ($100) in order to get the…...

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