Nerual Plasticity Paper

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Neural Plasticity Paper 1

Neural Plasticity Paper

Functions and Limitations of Neural Plasticity Research today has shown that “the capacity of the human brain for functional and structural reorganization throughout life is now well recognized.” (V. Valkanova, R. E. Rodriguez, K. P. Ebmeier. 2014) Neural Plasticity is what we understand as the brains ability to adapted to and repair damaged areas. In the case of Robert, who had a car wreck which left him with a traumatic brain injury, how does neuroplasticity play a role in his recovery? Since the damage was done in the frontal lobe, the areas that are affected are his hand/eye coordination, conscious thought, emotions, personality, attention span, motivation, judgment and organizational capacity. Finally, the damage to the frontal lobe often shows in risky behavior or impulsive behavior by the subject. This type of behavior requires the rehabilitation to begin with going back to basic human behavior. By this, Robert will have to relearn his relationship to himself as well as others,

Roberts brain itself will begin to rewire itself around the damaged of his brain. Neuroplasticity is a long process that requires Robert to relearn his skills that he has lost. Science has shown that with the rehabilitation and the repetition of these skills the brain can begin to rewire the wiring. For example, brain damage causes rapid cell death, and a disruption of functional circuits, in the affected regions. When the injured area begins to recover from the event that caused the cells to die, the brain's regenerative processes occur over several months can lead to some degree of functional recovery. What causes the recovery are such factors as the production of new neurons and glia, axonal sprouting of…...

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