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| Course Syllabus College of Humanities HUM/105 World Mythology | Copyright © 2011, 2009, 2005 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. Course Description

This course provides an overview of mythology and its relationship to ancient and current cultures. The course covers the purposes and types of myths, the development of myths and mythological characters, the common elements of mythological structures, the predominant characteristics of deities and sacred places in myth, contemporary theories of myths and mythology, and how myths and mythic structures shape contemporary culture. Policies

Faculty and students/learners will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents:

University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document.
Instructor policies: This document is posted in the Course Materials forum.

University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality.

Course Materials Leonard, S., & McClure, M. (2004). Myth & knowing: An introduction to world mythology. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Rosenberg, D. (2006). World mythology: An anthology of great myths and epics (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: McGraw Hill.

All electronic materials are available on the student website.

Week One: Foundations of Mythology | | Details | Due | Points | Objectives | 1.1 Differentiate how the word myth is used popularly with how it is defined academically. 1.2 Identify mythological themes that are universal among world cultures. 1.3 Analyze the relationship between knowledge, belief, myth, and religion.…...

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