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Miranda

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Miranda

The text Miranda is a short story from 1988 that debates the subject of abortion. The text is about Miranda, a young girl, who unintentionally gets pregnant with her boyfriend and how she and her closest handle the situation. The text takes point of view of Miranda through her young, naive eyes. The author gets close to various themes, including; love, abortion, choices, future etc. The society’s view of life in the late 80’s clearly shines through and the reader gets a sense of, how the general opinion on a situation such as Miranda’s was viewed upon at the time the text was written.

On her last night in home before college Miranda decides to sleep with Michael, because she is a normal young girl, who is very much in love with her boyfriend and nature just takes it course. Miranda then learns later on that she has become pregnant. Typically, this would be considered a tragedy where the young, hopeful child throws her education and future away to cope with the burden of an unwanted child – but that’s where Miranda is different. Although still a surprise, Miranda sees the child as a natural step in her life. Even when the people in her life is shocked and see this event as a setback Miranda sees it through different eyes. At first when her college roommate Holly perceives Miranda's world to be falling to pieces she copes with the situation calmly: “I’m all right” Miranda said, “I’m all right. I’m not in trouble I’m just having a baby” To her, the only other person she needs is Michael. This clearly shows her naive mind because she can’t imagine the consequences a baby would bring into her life. She does not really consider the issues of money and education but lives in a state of intoxication through her love to Michael. She even tells Holly how she wants to be owned by Michael. To her relief he appears to understand and offers to arrange a marriage for…...

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