Mental Theorys

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By BaseballThug
Words 262
Pages 2
Lobotomy is when the doctors would perform brain surgery. They insert a small incision to the prefrontal lobe of the brain. Lobotomy was first brought to the United States over 75 years ago. The first lobotomy in the U.S was performed by Walter Freeman and he operated on a Kansas house wife. Walter Freeman also created the 10-minute Trans orbital lobotomy (known as the “ice-pick” lobotomy), which was first performed at his Washington, D.C. office on January 17, 1946. He wanted it to be easy instead of just drilling into the brain so he came up with this idea of an ice pick instrument. He would stick the instrument into just above the eye and would swipe left to right and then would move to the other eye and the same thing with the instrument. Lobotomies were used to treat Schizophrenia and severe depression. Physicians even used it to treat chronic or severe pain and backaches. If I was in a psychiatric ward and a doctor tried to do this to me they would have to kill me. I couldn’t imagine getting an ice pick type instrument going in just above your eye and then the doctor scraping all in the brain. I am glad that they do not perform this operation I feel as if the operation is not humane. What if the doctor accidently shoved it all the way through your brain and you died how crazy would that be.
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