Lego Game Reflection

In: Business and Management

Submitted By vkjwrdskjhb
Words 457
Pages 2
Tyler Ferree
P429 – Lessons Learned from the Lego Game
9/3/15

The Lego game was used to teach the differences and similarities between three different types of manufacturing processes: job shop, manufacturing cell, and assembly line. In the different rounds/scenarios of the game, it was interesting to how each process worked. Depending on the round, each process showed that it had the clear advantage due to the specific order placed by the customer. Considering the quantity of products ordered, the assembly line and manufacturing cell had a clear advantage over the job shop. The assembly line was the best process for producing a large quantity of one single product because of the skill of each worker and the flow of the process. In the manufacturing cell, we had one person that was skilled to make the specific product, so the other three workers were idle when his/her products weren’t ordered. The job shop did not have a specific flow to the product because each worker had only one specific skill. Along with a large quantity of products, the manufacturing cell also excelled with a large variety of products. In the assembly line, it can be very difficult and costly to switch an assembly line flow based on the product. The job shop could succeed with a variety of products, but it proved to be difficult with a large quantity. The manufacturing cell proved to be the most successful with a large quantity of diverse products because of the reason mentioned above. Each worker was skilled to make one specific product, so the entire cell was productively making each product simultaneously. The job shop excelled in the last round of the Lego game. In the last round, each process was given a list of orders placed by customers. Each product had a different dollar value. The job shop was able to switch up the process to accommodate the larger value products at the…...

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