Law Discuss on Religious Act

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By tanviralam07
Words 7364
Pages 30
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Application Letter of Transmittal------------------------------------------------------------- 3

Law:

Religious Societies--------------------------------------------------------------------------- (4-6)

Vaccination act------------------------------------------------------------------------------ (7-16)

Kazis act------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ (17-18)

Acknowledgement----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 19

Executive Summary--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 20

Limitation---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 21

Introduction------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22

a) Appointment of new trustee ------------------------------------------------------------ 23

b) Appointment under section 2-------------------------------------------------------- (23-24)

c) Property to vest in new trustees without conveyance --------------------------- (24-25)

d) Provision for dissolution of societies and adjustment of their affairs---------------- 25

e) Questions may be submitted to High Court Division-----------------------------------25

Conclusion---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 26

Reference----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 27

American International University of Bangladesh (AIUB)
Kemal Ataturk Avenue, Banani
Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh

Sabrina Zarin
Faculty
Department of Business Administration

Subject: Law discuss on religious act

Dear Madam,
It is an honor and great pleasure for us to submit our term paper on Bangladesh law. This term paper was assigned to…...

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