Kirsten's Cookie

In: Business and Management

Submitted By cookie2012
Words 539
Pages 3
Kristen’s Cookie

1. How long does it take to fill a rush order [from mix and spoon, Load oven, bake, cool pack, and receive payment] ? (For orders of one dozen, and for orders of two dozens-same ingredients.)

Answer: (a) for orders of one dozen 26 minutes (b) for orders of two dozens 36 minutes

2. For orders of one dozen, how many orders can you fill in a night? Assuming 4 hours per night

- every order has a different recipe (so it does not add value to put pre-mixed ingredients ‘on stock’ during the night.
- There are enough cookie trays (only the oven is a bottleneck)
- The first step requires 6 minutes of attention, cleaning and loading the mixing equipment

 Capacity limited by throughput oven: o 4 hours = 240 minutes o Preparation before oven first batch - 8 minutes o Handling after last oven - 8 minutes
(potentially one minute can be saved on the last 8 minutes, by preparing the invoice during the cooling time, but it has no impact on the total number of batches)

- Remaining time for oven processes = 224 minutes

Answer: 22 orders if me and my roommate stick to the described processes

3. (A) Given Kristen’s Cookie wants to maximize the revenue, do you need to employ your roommate if all orders are one-dozen orders(assuming orders do not have the same ingredient)?
Answer: Need / No need
Why?

The takt time of the line is determined by the oven (bottleneck operation, excluding start up and close down times), 10 minutes.

The operator time (we could loosely describe as value added)
=6 (cleaning and mixing) +2 (spooning) +1 (loading oven) +2 (packing) +1 (invoicing) = 12 minutes.

To maximize the revenue we need 1.2 FTE (=>1.0), so I need my roommate to jump in.

(B) What if orders are two-dozen orders (assuming each two-dozen order has the same ingredients)? You may…...

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