Ism Code Influences Maritme Risk

In: Business and Management

Submitted By walterlush
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2. How has the ISM Code influenced maritime risk management/managers?

The ISM Code was a reactive response to maritime disasters, particularly the Herald of Free Enterprise. This instrument is a regulatory device which prescribes uniform principles and rules to be applied worldwide pertaining to safety at sea. The ISM Code is incorporated within Chapter IX of SOLAS and introduces a safety orientated concept known as safety culture. The main objective of the ISM Code is to administer safe practices in ship operation within a system of reporting and audits; also, prepare for emergencies that relate to safety and environmental protection. Section 10 of the ISM Code (Maintenance of the Ship and Equipment) requires that companies establish procedures in the Safety Management System (SMS) to hold inspections of equipment and technical systems at various intervals. Pursuant to sections 1.2.2(.2) and 2.2.1(.2) of the ISM Code, maritime risk managers are subject to the construction of various risk assessments.

The ISM Code has created a bureaucratic labyrinth for maritime risk management (MRM)/managers, which is laced in a plethora of written procedures and instructions for numerous onboard operations. These consist of routine activities which include cargo operations, navigation, and other repair activities such as dry-docking. Bhattacharya (2009) explains that risk assessment was recognized as the key characteristic of the SMS following a comprehensive study of certain companies. This research revealed that the companies’ SMS made reference to the hazards pertaining to these activities which consisted of collision, flooding, explosion, and occupational injuries. The procedures and instructions highlighted a list of risk reduction strategies or risk control measures for each hazard identified (p.153). Further analysis of the data evinced that managers…...

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