Irish American Immigration

In: Business and Management

Submitted By prixy1981
Words 1101
Pages 5
ETH/125 | Irish American Immigration | | | 6/12/2011 |

|

Though an Irish immigrants life in Ireland was cruel was cruel. Immigrating to America was not any better. Many immigrated to America to escape poverty, disease, and English oppression, they would face if they stayed in Ireland. They set out in masses on crowded ships called coffin ships, because they were the last resting place for many who crossed the Atlantic Ocean towards the land of prosperity. (yourirish.com) Once the immigrants stepped ashore they were pointed and laughed at because of their appearance. (Gavin, 2000) They would face segregation immediately, faced to live in slums of the major cities. Their living quarters of the immigrants would often consisting of a one room apartment, with no windows or ventilation, having to share a bathroom with other tenants, even worse were those who lived in cellars and shanties. (www. Kinsella.org) Being unfamiliar with plumbing and running water, the Irish immigrants were considered bad for the neighborhood. These conditions would breed sickness and early death. Immigrant workers would work any job available. This would cause United States citizens to have to fight for jobs. Racism would breed from this, local establishments would place signs in front of their businesses, and in local job postings, which stated, “No Irish Need Apply”, and some even would state “NO DOGS, NO BLACKS, AND NO IRISH”. (Gavin, 2000) The Irish people set out to prove they were honest, hard working people. They would use their work integrity to begin achieving their goals, and soon jobs opened up for them. (yourirish.com) Irish became a positive presence in the United States work force, and opinions would change as they become established citizens. Irish immigrants were subjected to dual labor market discrimination which is division of the…...

Similar Documents

Immigration

...Immigration Experience Deborah Lewis U. S. History 1865 to 1945 Carolyn Lawes, PhD December 17, 2012 This paper will be examining the Immigration from Italy to American. This paper will also give you a look into the political, social, and economic factors that led to migration. The Italians settled in New York City, so we will be looking at the tenement housing, working condition, and the journey from Italy to American. The attitudes of the Americans about the immigrations will also be examined. From 1906 to 1915 almost two million Italians migrated to the United States. Many Italians migrated to the United States because Italy there weren’t any jobs. Overpopulation and poverty was another reason Italians migrated to the United States. They believed that the United States was the land of opportunity and that they will find better jobs and housing. The poverty rate in Italy included lack of medical care, lack of schooling, and poor housing conditions. When they decided to come to America it was a way to escape from these things. The bad economy and the shortage of land caused Italian immigrants to leave Italy. The Majority of the immigrants settled in New York City when they got to the United States. Some of them migrated because of political reasons or because of the dream of one day of returning to Italy with enough money to buy land. Political hardship was also a factor in the Italians migrating to America. In the 1870s the government took measures...

Words: 1027 - Pages: 5

Analysis of the Irish Labour Market and Immigration Since Eu Enlargement

...you should analyse the causes and consequences of being NEET. Your analysis should also critically comment on existing policy solutions and make relevant proposals to improve future policy directions. Part 1: ‘A labour market can be understood as the mechanism through which human labour is bought and sold as a commodity and the means by which labour demand (the number and type of available jobs) is matched with labour supply (the number and type of available workers).’ (Thompson, P 2003) In other words, it looks at the participation within the market for people wanting jobs, people having jobs & the number/types of jobs available. Why have I chosen this data? In order for me to answer part one; I must gauge what aspects of the Irish Labour Market I must analyse to provide an accurate statistical profile. ‘Whilst there is a wealth of data on the labour market, a number of studies are regarded as 'key.' The key individual aspects on the labour market are unemployment, the Population & relationships between health and labour market variables.’(Economic & Social Data Service) ‘Labour market statistics are designed to reflect the various aspects of labour market activity in your chosen country. Labour market statistics measure many different aspects of work and jobs and provide an insight into the economy.’ (http://www.statistics.gov.uk/hub/labour-market/index.html) Employment & Unemployment Rates: Unemployment rates are a good indication of how well a......

Words: 3641 - Pages: 15

Mexican American Immigration

...Mercado- López Mexican American immigration act There are lots of current policies/events going around in the world and it affects the Mexican Americans community, but there is one that affects mostly all Mexican Americans is the immigration which is the most issue in the United States and Mexico. Mexican and Mexican American immigrants seem to share a common culture identity because of discrimation. Currently discrimination has influenced young and older Mexican Americans so that some fear they have gained into the American society. Current immigration is fair and without immigration the United States would not be as nearly as diverse as it is today. First the United States should allow a certain number of immigrants each year so immigrants who need protection. This also protects people from persecution and shows that the United States should welcome immigrants who need a safe environment. The United States immigration also focuses on immigrants from North America, particulately from México. Mexicans immigrants come to the United States because they believe they will find work (farm work) in the fall because it’s a seasonal and they seek a job. It also affects the Mexican American community because as immigrants enter the United States they are more likely to in areas where their family and friends settle in with them and people consider it to be overcrowded and Mexican immigrants start taking over the Mexican American jobs. With this overcrowded......

Words: 755 - Pages: 4

Irish American

...The Fighting Irish: From Beginning to End-Fighting for Fun, Life, With a Big Heart Tanya Drummond Maryville University Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide information relating to Irish immigrants and Irish-American culture. Religious beliefs remain of importance to many Irish families, as well as traditional celebrations including St. Patrick’s Day. Linking alcohol and celebrations, Irish people are high risk for alcoholism. Furthermore, studies show that heart disease is the number one cause of death within this group of people, causing further alarm of the rampant use of alcohol. Healthcare providers have a duty to prevent further destruction of this jovial society by intervening when welcomed by family and those afflicted by alcohol. The Fighting Irish: From Beginning to End-Fighting for Fun, Life, With a Big Heart Today’s Irish population may not be quite as rowdy as once depicted. However, if provoked in the slightest, most likely the person doing the aggravating will soon find out why Irishmen have rightfully earned the nickname, “The Fighting Irish”. As an Irish descendant with the surname, McCollum, I can honestly attest to this part of the Irish temperament. Furthermore, Irishmen do not exclude their own family from violence either. A holiday with my family wouldn’t be normal without a few fist fights as the celebrations continue into the evening hours. When the fights are over, ill feelings released, and more Guinness is flowing we......

Words: 1825 - Pages: 8

Fact and Fiction of Irish Americans

...Fact and Fiction of Irish Americans History of the Immigration Beginning almost 300 years ago Irish immigrants were among the first large groups of people to migrate to the New World. With years of wars, famine, and religious persecution in Ireland, these people came to America to build a new life. Not afraid of hard work the Irish came and built a life they could be proud of; although the Irish American believes that they have been victim of discrimination. NINA ‘No Irish Need Apply’ and WASP ‘White Anglo Saxon Protestant’ is and ingrained belief that the Irish American’s “remember” (Jenson, 2004). Another current issue is the unjust treatment of the Irish seeking political asylum in the United States (McElrath, 1997). The first Irish immigrants came in the 1580s to the Carolinas long before the founding of the United States of America. It is believed that possibly hundreds of thousands of Protestant Irish immigrated in these early years. This is contrary to the urban myth of the Irish Catholic American origins (Meagher, 2009). The next big migration of Irish to America was in the 1700s to 1820s. These immigrants assimilated easily into the American way of life as most prospered at a rate that could not have been conceived in Ireland. “Nearly half of General Washington’s continental arm, including 1492 officers and 22 generals, were of Irish descent” (American Immigration law Foundation, 2001, p. 1). Even with the influx of Irish throughout early history of......

Words: 1191 - Pages: 5

Illegal Immigration, American/Mexican Border

...Illegal Immigration and Border Policy In recent years, Illegal immigration has been a contemporary political and social debate. It has been the platform of many politicians, especially in the southwest, and it is often a popular subject in news media. People in favor of strict immigration policy often claim that illegal immigrants are costly to the American economy and that they take American jobs. The border control policy is ineffective, it is often too costly for its effectiveness. Border policies have increased the number of immigrant deaths in the deserts of border states. Not only that but the US/Mexico border is harmful to the environment. The anti-immigration policy that's currently in effect goes against a rich cultural history in North America. Lastly, popular arguments made for strict immigration will be brought to light. In 2006, George W. Bush signed H.R. 6061, also known as the Secure Fence Act, in an attempt to increase border security and expand the US/Mexico Border. Prompted by heightened national security measures after 9/11, the bill was designed to "help protect the American people" and marked " an important step toward immigration reform" (Bush 2006). The bill doubled funding for border security, increasing expenditures from $4.6 billion in 2001 to $10.4 billion in 2006. This money went to "[authorize] the construction of hundreds of miles of additional fencing along our Southern border" and to "[deploy] thousands of National Guard members to......

Words: 1810 - Pages: 8

Immigration

...This record of Italian immigration is a key component in understanding my family background and facilitating a focal point in the century fueling Italian immigration. My grandmother’s perspective is a firsthand account that reveals the methods in which Italian immigrants assimilated and even influenced American culture. Their initial reaction along with the hardships of being new in a strange new world is a fascinating piece of American History. This presentation serves as a small piece of historical content revealing how foreigners relied on this country as a catalyst in building a life one could only dream of. Genetically, my background consists of an array of European influences. However, my family majorly identifies and honors our bloodline of Sicilian descent. My mother comes from a very strong German, Italian upbringing while my father is primarily and predominantly most associated with Italian; specifically speaking, Sicilian. The idea of having to record this information proved to be extremely important in historical value and delivered a sense of pride in my understanding of family foundation. The influx of Italian heritage and culture defined American lifestyle from the mid1800’s all the way until the late 1900’s. It is one of the most abundantly and culturally enriching populations to hit American soil, primarily the East coast. My earliest American relatives date back to 1905 in the midst of Italian Influx to American Eastern coastal suburbs and city areas. One...

Words: 665 - Pages: 3

Irish Immigration and Nativism

...April 2013 Irish Immigration and Nativism Immigration to the United States has shaped our country from its founding to the present day. The United States went through a large agricultural and industrial expansion in the 19th century and with that came a large wave of immigration from Western Europe. During this time Ireland’s potato crop became diseased, causing widespread famine and the country went through a period called the Great Hunger. These two factors were instrumental in the almost 3.5 million Irish that immigrated to American between 1820 and 1880. The Irish met with much adversity when they arrived here. A wave of nativism toward their religion, and also poverty made life difficult in the beginning. The Irish had faced adversity and oppression before, but their solidarity along with their strength and religious beliefs made it possible for them to find a better life by striving for success economically, politically and socially. Irish immigrants arrived here with very little education or skill set and jobs were hard to find. They came from poverty so they had little money or resources to start a business. Many of them did not want to return to farming because of their experience in Ireland. Women found jobs as maids, cooks, nannies or factory workers. Because of the country’s large industrial expansion many of the male immigrants worked long hard hours building bridges, railroad and canals for very low wages. Americans were not happy the Irish were......

Words: 579 - Pages: 3

Immigration Threaten American Culture

...English 711 Auster’s “Immigration Threatens American Culture” After reading Auster’s essay critically, (1) outline his essay; and (2) answer the following questions: I. Outline 1. 1965 Immigration Act which opened US immigration. 2. There is no doubt that the cultural left hates American and wants to destroy it. 3. The patriotic and Christian Right supports exactly the same immigration policy that is supported by the anti-American. 4. American acknowledges abandoning American culture. II. Questions 1. What is the author’s main claim (thesis)? Where can you locate it? Is it clearly stated fairly early in the essay? Does it reflect the purpose of the essay? The main idea is immigration take influence to American culture. It’s clearly but it doesn’t reflect the purpose. 2. What are his subsidiary claims? In other words, what are the claims that he uses to support his main claim? Are they clear and valid? Are they related to the main claim? They are clear and valid and related to the main claim. 3. List the kind of evidence Auster uses for each claim/idea (e.g., reasoning, facts, statistics, examples, personal experience, expert testimony/authoritative statements, comparison, analogy). Remember to answer for EACH claim. Example, reasoning and comparison. 4. Discuss whether the evidence of EACH claim/idea is sufficient, specific, relevant, and convincing. I think each claim is specific and convincing. 5. List the......

Words: 358 - Pages: 2

Immigration

...Joey Dorion American Immigration II Professor McEvoy Paper 1 The United States has long held the title of a “land of immigrants,” a place where the downtrodden and rejected peoples of the old world could come to ply their trade, to attempt to carve out a meaningful existence for themselves. The American Dream was alive and well in the early waves of immigrants, as they came from the desired parts of Europe: namely England and Western Europe. They came with fire in their spirit, and determination to make a better life for themselves than they were able to have back in the Old World. They adapted, they assimilated, and they were able to become functioning and respected members of American society. It wasn’t until the second waves of immigrants arrived that a major opposition was formed, as fear of the foreigner spurred “old” immigrants and the “old” families of the northeast to preserve their ideals. It was with a deliberate and systematic approach that legislation was passed between the years of 1882 and 1929, keeping out those less than desired groups: Italians, Chinese, those from southwestern Europe. The White Anglo-Saxon Protestant preference was alive and out in the open in the American public, and all other policymaking went towards limiting only those who were thought not to possess the potential to become the epitome of the American citizen. The history of American immigration is one that is littered with racism, and more often than not blatant...

Words: 1994 - Pages: 8

20th Century American Immigrations

...HIST125-1201A-12 Phase II – 20th Century American Immigrations 18 January 2012 Jennifer Doucette Colorado Technical University I am a German-American Scientist, “born in Ulm, Wurttemberg on March 14, 1879” to Hermann and Pauline. Because my mother loved music, which enhanced my appreciation for music, she provided violin lessons for me when I was around six years of age. Most of my time was spent in intellectual solitude and relaxation. I spent my early years growing up in Munich, where I begin school at Luitpold Gymnasium, and my father manufactured electrical products. I have one sister named Maja, she was born in 1881. When my father’s business failed, he and I moved to Milan Italy. In 1896, I begin studying in Zurich, at the Swiss Federal Polytechnic Institute. I received my teaching degree in physics and mathematics in 1900; the same year I renounced my German citizenship, leaving me stateless until 1901, when I become a Swiss citizen. (http://german.about.com) I was employed at the Swiss Patent Office in Berlin from 1902 to 1909, at which time, a fellow colleague at Polytechnic Institute named Mileva Maric, out of wedlock, gave birth to our daughter, Liserl. We later gave her up for adoption. On January 6, 1903, Mileva and I were married in Zurich; we have two sons. (Jahr, 2005) In 1905, I published my doctoral dissertation, including Relativitatstheorie, and received a PhD from the University of Zurich. I served, in 1909 as a Professor at the University of Zurich and...

Words: 1296 - Pages: 6

Irish Immigration

...Ian Fischer January 26, 2014 Paper #1 for Global Issues Irish Immigration Before and After the Potato Famine Globalization is to be defined as, “The worldwide movement toward economic, financial, trade, and communications integration,” according to BusinessDictionary.com. The immigration to the exponentially growing United States had been open to all types of ethnicities and cultures throughout the 18th and 19th Century, and along the North-Eastern coast, the people of Ireland were settling. I chose this group and time frame, because I believe it represents globalization at its finest. Immigrants from Ireland had been immigrating to the United States before the Potato Famine, but it had been just the wealthy population of Ireland, because they could afford to start a new life in America. After the Potato Famine in the 1840’s, the majority of the immigrants were the surviving peasants of Ireland, which I will need to research why that was. As I searched for a background source by looking up Irish Immigration to the United States, I found a very informing and reliable website named Irishamericanjourney.com. After I read through this website, I was able to understand their culture and the reasoning behind why they left their country even before the Potato Famine, and how these Irish immigrants were accepted into American Culture and ideology. To find even more in depth information I used Google Scholar through the library’s database to explore what books and......

Words: 507 - Pages: 3

Do American Companies Get Harmed by Immigration Workers

...Karl Evers Christopher Johnson English 110 06/02/15 Do American Companies Get Harmed by Immigration Workers Immigration is one of the more debated topics in America nowadays. Historically, immigrants have come to the U.S. because of difficult times living in their home countries. Many immigrants choose to move, some even get forced to move, but most migrants do it in a search for a better future. “There are many reasons for a country to attract immigrations; the most common reason is the need for labor.”(Annan, 149) Immigrants perform services that the host population is willing to consume but is either unwilling or incapable to provide for itself. Jobs vary from highly skilled work in research to less skilled jobs in fields such as nursing the sick and elderly, working on construction sites, running shops that are open 24/7, or taking care of households and their housework, often while the owners are pursuing their own career goals. American companies use of hiring immigrants’ instead of Americans benefits them in three different ways: first, immigrants fulfill the demand for low wage jobs; second, immigrants help countries increase their globalization; and third, immigrants help balance a countries economy. One reason that companies hire immigrants instead of Americans is to fulfill the demand for low wage jobs. While unemployed people in the U.S. first think about what their wages will be, immigrants from developing countries usually don’t care what kind of job it......

Words: 1048 - Pages: 5

Irish Americans: Cultural Implications in Psychotherapy Treatment

...Irish Americans: Cultural Implications In Psychotherapy Treatment Elizabeth Mathews Loma Linda University Table of Content Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……… 3 Background………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…………. 3 Culture.………………..………………………………………………………………………………...…………….3 Historical………………………………………………………………………………………………..………….. 4 Characteristics.………………………………………………………………………………......…………………………. 4 Language. ………………………………………………………………...………………………………………….4 Oppression………………………………………………………………………………………………….……….5 Alcohol…………...…………………………………………………………………………………………..……….5 Depression and Suicide…………………………………………………………………………………………...………6 Northern Ireland………………………………………………………………………………………..……….. 6 Depression and Cultural Impact………………………………………………………………….……….. 7 Suicide and Cultural Change…………………………………………………………………………………8 Family Structure….………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10 Women/Mothers ……………………………………………………………………………………………….11 Men/Fathers….…………………………………………………………………………………………………..11 Children………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………12 In Therapy……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12 Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………13 References……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………15 There are assumptions and stereotypes surrounding every cultural group in the world; some are true and some are far from accurate. These assumptions and stereotypes provide a lens through which one experiences people they......

Words: 4100 - Pages: 17

Immigration

...Immigration Citizens Children The Effects of Immigration on Children and Families Introduction Illegal immigration is a very controversial issue within our society. There are families within our society that are made up of parents that are here illegally but have children who are born here and are citizens. But it is these citizens that are what I am referring to as the incomplete citizens. Who are these incomplete citizens and why are they being impacted by our society? Are there different stipulations for these children that are born to these undocumented families? Do they really receive the same rights as those born to U.S. citizens? Our societies including our politicians have different opinions about illegal immigration. Immigration reform negatively affects those children that are born to undocumented parents. They find themselves facing adversities that had the situation been different would never have to face. Working in an elementary school I have seen first hand how those children are affected as a result of their parent’s legal status. My purpose in this research is to show the emotional, educational, and financial effects that are inflicted on the undocumented families. This is a problem that is not going to be resolved overnight but rather this is a problem that is going to need help from the various disciplines. With this research more information will be found to present how children are affected through the different disciplines and how these......

Words: 4046 - Pages: 17