How Successful Were Hitler's Economic Policies from 1933 – 39?

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How successful were Hitler's economic policies from 1933 – 39?

Superficially, Hitler's economic policies were extremely successful. He appeared to have virtually eradicated unemployment, something no democratic Western power was able to achieve in the 1930s and within three years of gaining office. Yet beneath the "economic miracle", as Ian Kershaw points out, Hitler was pursuing economic policies in those early years which could only lead to war or a loss of power. The reality was that Hitler understood little about economics and seemed to care even less. His aims were to create full employment without inflation, to make Germany self-sufficient and to create Wehrwirtschaft, a defence economy, but in pursuing these policies he created problems which were to lead to serious differences within the Party and which drove Germany to war earlier than intended.
One reason why the Nazis were successful with their economic policies was due to Dr Hjalmar Schacht. Schacht directed the German economy from 1933 – 36, he believed in a steady growth/currency. Schacht employed specific strategies which would subsequently improve the German economy. Schacht took control of state finances within the economy, set low interest rates to inspire investor confidence, rescheduled local authority debts and set about forming a public sector investor programme, i.e. housing and jobs.
These targets were on the whole achieved successfully. Lower taxes brought prosperity to farmers in particular, who were the hardest hit by the ‘economic slump’. Grants were provided for homes, repairs and the rehiring of domestic service. State invested projects such as public works programmes; rearmament, reforestation and a state labour service created the steps to solving Germany’s social disharmony. Certainly this period, 33 – 36, is one where historians agree the reconstruction, stabilisation and…...

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