Health and Law Ethics

In: Business and Management

Submitted By misty72
Words 649
Pages 3
DQ 1 1. In the Moore case, a dissented judge wrote: “one searches…in vain for a description of “unprofessional conduct” even in general terms. Herein lies the difficulty with the instant matter. A hospital should not be permitted to adopt standards for the exclusion of doctors which are so vague and ambiguous as to provide a substantial danger of arbitrary discrimination in their application. “Do you believe the author of that opinion would dissent in the Leach case as well? Why or why not?
Both cases are different and based on the information provide a lot was left assumed. Moore was terminated by the Board due to unprofessional actions not utilizing sterile products “gloves”. There was nothing else mentioned regarding Moore. No other expert witnesses addressing Moore ability to perform, physical ailments, or mental condition referenced. The judge’s decision was clearly based on no sufficient supporting evidence. Moore could have been reprimanded at the hospital level for failing to follow standard operating procedures as a first time offense. However performing a surgery without sterilization can use patient harm or death. “Unprofessional conduct” from the hospitals definition needed to be reviewed by HR and clarified to all. In Leach’s case his continuous behavior prompted suspension of duties/licenses and approval by the staff and Board. There are processing in place to proving “unprofessional conduct” that provides several options to hospitals (i.e. documenting behavior, suspension, reassignment of duties or recommend to Board) (Showalter, 2007). No judge would dissent in the Leah’s case. Leah was apparently suffering from alcohol, drug or mental issues that impaired his abilities and altered his behavior. 2. What do you suppose were the “disruptive behaviors” involved in the Moore and Leach cases? Why do the courts not describe them in detail?
It is…...

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