Fiji Water

In: Business and Management

Submitted By alcapone
Words 1041
Pages 5
To: FIJI Water
From: Alex Nash
Date: March 15, 2011
Subject: Carbon footprint analysis and solutions

FIJI Water has always been proud of its environmentally friendly image. The company has always honored its corporate social responsibilities by being involved with many environmental groups and is currently partnered with Conservation International, an environmental organization engaged in a large-scale rainforest conservation project in Fiji. During the past couple of years FIJI Water has been under scrutiny over the claim that it removes more carbon from the atmosphere than it puts into it. FIJI Water is accused of greenwashing, claims that its water products are carbon negative. It is also accused of being unethical with its relationship with the FIJI government and FIJI natives over tax increases on exports. This report will contain a brief description of these claims and problems along with proposed solutions and recommendations.
Analysis
FIJI Water has been under attacks from the environmental Newport Trial Group for claims that it is not leaving a carbon footprint on the environment and the islands of Fiji. The Newport Trial Group argues that FIJI Water is not a carbon negative company and is profiting from this false claim. FIJI Water is also attempting to gain high profits and market share over other bottled water companies because of its claim to be one of the only carbon negative bottled water. FIJI Water is not a carbon negative company. It uses a method know as “Forward Crediting” which means FIJI Water claims credit for removing carbon that may not even take place at all because it can be decades in the future.
Furthermore FIJI Water is also accused of being unethical with the local government of Fiji. It was involved in a standoff with the Fijian military about extraction taxes. The company threatened to leave the island of Fiji…...

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