Fefer

In: Miscellaneous

Submitted By zeitgeist27
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Toxins present in the food web
Bacillus thuringiensis kills the larvae of certain flies and mosquitoes. The main targets for this Bt are the larval stages of mosquitoes, black flies, and fungus gnats; it does not kill larval stages of "higher" flies such as the house fly, stable fly, or blow flies.

Microcystis, can pass through the gut of grass carp unharmed, and pick up nutrients while in the gut. Thus, in some cases, blue-green algae blooms have been exacerbated by grass carp. Also, Microcystis has been shown to produce more toxins in the presence of grass carp. Grass carp, which have natural defenses to their toxins, sometimes can contain enough algal toxins in their systems that they become hazardous to eat.

Ecosystem’s evasive species
The Burmese python has its origins in Southeast Asia and was introduced in Everglades in 1979. Perhaps no other invasive species has attracted as much media attention at Burmese pythons in Florida, particularly after spectacular photographs and eyewitness accounts of struggles between native alligators and these snakes were released. Burmese pythons have voracious appetites and have been found to eat animals ranging in size from wrens to white-tailed deer. A study by Michael Dorcas of Davidson College found some mammals populations have dropped 90 percent in areas populated by the pythons. They share the top of the food chain in the Everglades with alligators and prey on 39 endangered species and 41 additional rare species. They continue to be sold as pets; around 6,000 pythons were imported into Miami from 2003 to 2005. They are removed immediately from Everglades National Park; as of 2007, national park staff report extracting a total of 600 pythons. Another 300 were captured in 2008 alone. As of 2012, it's estimated 30,000 are living in South Florida in 2012.
The Common Myna has its origins in Southeast Asia and was…...

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