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End of Life Care

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End of Life Care
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End of Life Care The cause for the trend of majority of elderly people not dying in their own homes as their preference is NHS failings, incorporating a scarcity of health visitors, which ensues in the desires of the elderly persons being ignored or not adhered to. Owing to poor co-ordination of social and health care services for the dying, the preferences of the individuals nearing death frequently go unidentified, and in instances where the preference to die at home is clearly stated, it frequently cannot be met (Rensbergen, Nawrot, Hecke, & Nemery, 2006). The social and healthcare providers conventionally offer low priority to end-of-life care as is evident in the lack of adequate training among significant staff. Another reason encompasses social-contextual elements. Gender, living status, and age are predictors of the location of death; however, the implant of a nursing home in a domestic community is the fundamental factor (Rensbergen, Nawrot, Hecke, & Nemery, 2006). As a nurse, to support clients in end-of-life care, and in reinforcing their preferences, one can come up with creative partnerships with healthcare professionals, patients, policy developers, and others to ascertain that care of the dying is prioritized. Moreover, one can record the comprehensive requirements of dying patients and families and taking note of individual, organizational, professional, and societal hindrances to quality end-of-life care (Rushton, 2015). It will be beneficial to be involved as a member of interdisciplinary gatherings in specialty aspects, communities, or societies to develop particular remedies to counter barriers, and create guidelines for valuable end-of-life care (Rushton, 2015). One can recommend and reinforce frameworks of responsibility for holistic and comprehensive end-of-life care that incorporates…...

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