Electroinc Surveillance of Employees

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mkimstar
Words 4553
Pages 19
Where can an employee reasonably expect to have privacy? Employee’s expect to have a reasonable amount privacy in the work place at least in their own work space but today that may not be all possible due to electronic Surveillance . Employees are becoming increasingly concerned about their privacy as their employers are monitoring them electronically more closely than ever before. Still employees expect to have privacy at the lunch area, bathrooms and lockers. Besides those places the employee has little or almost no privacy within the company. Electronic monitoring allows an employer to observe what employees do on the job and review employee communications, including e-mail and Internet activity, often capturing and reviewing communications that employees consider private. Video monitoring is common in many work environments to maintains security, by monitoring employees and to deter theft.
There are laws set in place to also protect the privacy tof employee’s personnel records, including personal data, medical information and health status, social security numbers, background screenings information, financial and everything else that could invade a persons privacy.

Is Herman's need to know whether his salespersons are honest a sufficient ground for utilizing electronic surveillance?

The answer probably depends on whether there are alternative methods of ascertaining the honesty of salespersons that are less invasive of the employees' privacy. For example, Herman could use surveys of customers to find out this information. In fact, many businesses use customer surveys rather than electronic surveillance to evaluate the honesty of their sales personnel. 1. Does it matter whether the customer benefits from electronic surveillance of which the customer is unaware?

The answer is no. It does not matter whether the customer…...

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