Driven Athletic Footwear Executive Summary

In: Business and Management

Submitted By lau0321
Words 1148
Pages 5
Driven Athletic Footwear Executive Summary

Introduction/Key Issues:

Driven is a key competitor in the footwear industry and we have some pretty impressive results in terms of revenue generated and market share. However, this report will outline some areas where we needed to improve and correct. Specifically, this relates to how to handle supply issues, how to reduce costs and overhead charges and how to continue to increase value to our shareholders.

Recommendations:

In order to counter the above issues we have determined that Driven could have:
1. Retained capacity in our plants to continue to produce and supply the market with our goods and:
a. Over-produce in early years and hold inventory for when demand jumped in later years
b. Take advantage of Private Label production
c. Clear out the prior year inventory at discount prices
2. Boosted EPS, ROE and Stock Price by:
a. Buying back more stock
b. Issuing higher dividends
c. Further reduce costs by producing Private Label Shoes
Conclusion:

Throughout the past seven years, Driven has been able to build efficiencies in our operations and we have been fairly consistent in meeting investor’s expectations in terms of stock price, return on equity and earnings per share. We have been able to learn how to continue to make strides and what we must do in the future to boost these figures even higher to both provide the most value to our shareholders and position ourselves in the market. Explanatory Report
Driven Athletic Footwear Company’s main objective was to create the competitive advantage in all regions by gaining the market share while increasing shareholder’s wealth. First, we aspired to create a brand the consumers would want and retailers would want to carry; therefore throughout the years we made attempts to increase the S/Q rating of our products, increase production…...

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