Discuss in Detail Two Different Performances of King Lear on Stage, Film or Tv.

In: English and Literature

Submitted By dfemij
Words 1863
Pages 8
English 3
Group AA Due: 04 October 2013
Monday 09:35 Dr. D. Seddon

Early Modern Literature

Discuss in detail two different performances of King Lear on stage, film or TV. Your discussion should include an assessment of the relative merits of the directorial decisions as regards characterization, setting, costume, and dialogue.

The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an 'objective correlative'; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked. (Eliot, 1919) William Shakespeare’s King Lear is considered by many to be one of his most powerful pieces. Its universal themes and messages that seep through have inspired many other works and allowed room for several adaptations. In his influential critical essay on Hamlet, T.S. Eliot suggests that one could “examine any of Shakespeare’s more successful tragedies…” and always “… find this exact equivalence” (1919). His term ‘objective correlative’ encompasses the phenomena of emotional reaction being created in the audience by the writer or poet or playwrights combination of images, objects or description which evoke the appropriate emotions. This balance of emotions inspired by a narrative determines the success of the objective correlative. Directors in film use the camera to produce and emotional algebra, through which a sequence of images added together form a more complex and prompt emotional reaction in the audience. This essay hopes to explore and discuss the artistic formulas used in Sir Trevor Nunn’s…...

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