Development of Corrections

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Submitted By cmarczuk
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Development of Corrections
Caroline E Marczuk
University of Phoenix, Development of Corrections
Professor David
December 20th, 2015

200- to 300-word response to the following questions: * What were women's prisons like before the 1800s? How have they changed? * What are the three basic arguments established in the 1800s that supported the separation of juvenile prisoners from adult prisoners? What would happen if there were no distinction between prisons for juveniles and adults? * What was the purpose of prison labor? What caused the decline of prison labor?
The original idea of the big house was to provide an income to the state for the sale of goods produced by prisoners to the public to cover the cost to build and facilitate the prisoners by industrializing the prisoners. Hard work cut the rate of criminal activity by burning down the energy prisoners once had by being subject to solitary confinement. The income would go into state accounts helping cover the costs to house so many inmates and decrease taxes that citizens had to pay which was very costly. There were fewer women than in later dates that were locked up, women and children were not housed separately either they were treated equally as grown men this created conflict and, even more, criminal activity within the big house. Women were subject to sexual abuse from not only the male prisoners but also male guards. Women were more at risk for harassment of both verbal and sexual until 1816 when Elizabeth Foster began addressing the issues that were faced by women inmates not only harassment, but also what women were physically capable when labor was considered. (Foster, 2005, p. 32). Labor was highly believed in unlike solitary confinement that was the traditional approach. During this period of the big house, they believed that solitary confinement was reserved only for punishment.…...

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