Data Collector Field Guide

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Qualitative Research Methods:
A D ATA C O L L E C T O R ’ S FIELD GUIDE

NATASHA MACK • CYNTHIA WOODSONG KATHLEEN M. MACQUEEN • GREG GUEST • EMILY NAMEY

Qualitative Research Methods:
A D ATA C O L L E C T O R ’ S FIELD GUIDE

NATASHA MACK • CYNTHIA WOODSONG KATHLEEN M. MACQUEEN • GREG GUEST • EMILY NAMEY

F A M I L Y

H E A L T H

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Family Health International (FHI) is a nonprofit organization working to improve lives worldwide through research, education, and services in family health.

This publication was made possible through support provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), under the terms of Cooperative Agreement No. CCP-A-00-95-00022-02. The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID.

ISBN: 0-939704-98-6 Qualitative Research Methods: A Data Collector’s Field Guide © 2005 by Family Health International Family Health International P.O. Box 13950 Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 USA http://www.fhi.org E-mail: publications@fhi.org

Contents
Acknowledgments Introduction Case Study Module 1 — Qualitative Research Methods Overview Introduction to Qualitative Research Comparing Quantitative and Qualitative Research Sampling in Qualitative Research Recruitment in Qualitative Research Ethical Guidelines in Qualitative Research Suggested Readings Module 2 — Participant Observation Overview of Participant Observation Ethical Guidelines Logistics of Participant Observation How to Be an Effective Participant Observer Tips for Taking Field Notes Suggested Readings Case Study Samples Participant Observation Steps Module 3 — In-Depth Interviews Overview of In-Depth Interviewing Ethical Guidelines Logistics of Interviewing How to Be an Effective Interviewer Tips for Taking Interview Notes Suggested Readings Case Study Samples…...

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