Culture Shocks Depicted in the Film 'Lost in Translation'

In: Film and Music

Submitted By leansz
Words 605
Pages 3
Three important cultural interactions from ‘Lost In Translation’:

1. Greeting Scene

Bob arrives at the Park Hyatt Tokyo Hotel and is immediately greeted by his Japanese associates. They greet him with gifts and present their business cards instead of the casual handshaking or general conversation making to build rapport. It is evident that this scene demonstrates the honorifics in Japanese communication. This is incredibly crucial in terms of communicating as the Japanese addresses/refers to one another accordingly depending on their position. I find this scene to be interesting as the Japanese always demonstrate a sense of humbleness and respect for one another and expect these customs to uphold even with foreigners who may not yet fully understand what is expected of them.

2. Whiskey Commercial

During Bob’s filming of the commercial, it is evident that there is a large language barrier between the director, the Japanese interpreter and himself. The director gives Bob instructions that seem to be incredibly complex and somewhat offensive due to his body language and tone of voice. However, the translator only interprets a few words from the director’s lengthy instructions and Bob becomes incredibly confused. It is evident that this scene demonstrates ambiguity (aimai) as the interpreter may not want to cause offence and conflict between the director and Bob. It also can be said that the interpreter didn’t want to abuse her position as an interpreter by being out of line and causing strife between the two individuals. This scene is very interesting to me as I find that Japanese people really do uphold their position throughout most social interactions as a sign of respect and humbleness despite it causing confusion and frustration for the individual who cannot fully comprehend the situation.

3. Flower Arrangement Scene

Charlotte stumbles upon a…...

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