Consumer Protection Act 1999

In: Social Issues

Submitted By hitsugayaima
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9

CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT 1999 | Application: offer or supply of goods to one or more consumers
Application: offer or supply of goods to one or more consumers

Meaning of consumer: a person who acquires or uses goods or services ordinarily acquired for personal, domestic or household purpose; S3
Meaning of consumer: a person who acquires or uses goods or services ordinarily acquired for personal, domestic or household purpose; S3
S.6(1): cannot exclude the operation of CPA 1999
S.6(1): cannot exclude the operation of CPA 1999

3. Implied Guarantee as To Fitness for Particular Purpose
Sec. 33(1) – Implied: goods are reasonably fit for any particular purpose known by consumer, expressly or by implication to the supplier as the purpose it is purchased
However, if supplier represents goods fit for a particular purpose, it should also be reasonably fit for that purpose.
Does not apply: Consumer doesn’t rely on the supplier’s skill/judgment or if unreasonable to do so
Goods used for other than normal purpose (known to supplier), must be reasonably fit for that purpose

3. Implied Guarantee as To Fitness for Particular Purpose
Sec. 33(1) – Implied: goods are reasonably fit for any particular purpose known by consumer, expressly or by implication to the supplier as the purpose it is purchased
However, if supplier represents goods fit for a particular purpose, it should also be reasonably fit for that purpose.
Does not apply: Consumer doesn’t rely on the supplier’s skill/judgment or if unreasonable to do so
Goods used for other than normal purpose (known to supplier), must be reasonably fit for that purpose

2. Implied Guarantee as To Acceptable Quality
“Acceptable quality” criteria(s):
- Goods fit for ALL purposes supplied to a customer.
- Acceptable in appearance, free from minor, defects, safe and durable
- Considers whether a reasonable…...

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