Conflict Management 12 Angry Men

In: Film and Music

Submitted By Richmeister26
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Within the movie 12 Angry Men there this is a big theme of conflict that takes place. It revolves around the jurors arguing about the conclusion of the trial that is taking place and whether the suspect is innocent or guilty. Conflict as defined in our book is a serious disagreement or argument. There are 5 key conflict styles that can be seen throughout the movie from the jurors arguing with each about different topics. These styles are accommodating, avoiding, collaborating, competing, and compromising.
Accommodating is when you cooperate to a high-degree, and it may be at your own expense, and actually work against your own goals, objectives, and desired outcomes. In the movie Juror number 8, the architect, is the one I see as the accommodator. He is cooperating with the others but he is still arguing to an extent with the outcome of everyone else. He knows that it will be easier to agree with everyone and vote the suspect guilty but in the movie he truly believes that the suspect is innocent and because of his knowledge and ability to debate and accommodate with the others he proves him innocent. Avoiding is when you simply avoid the issue. You aren’t helping the other party reach their goals, and you aren’t assertively pursuing your own. This works when the issue is trivial or when you have no chance of winning. The salesmen, Juror #7, is the one I feel that uses avoiding constantly throughout the juror decision. He is always disregarding what everyone says because he wants to go to the baseball game that is supposed to happen later that night. In the movie when they are trying to talk to him, he walks away avoiding what the others are trying to tell him and just wants to leave. I feel like he is the one in the entire film that uses this style of conflict the most.
Next is collaborating is where you partner or pair up with the other party to achieve both…...

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