British History

In: Historical Events

Submitted By joycey
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Pages 12
Dossier #6 TRADITION AND MODERNITY

“The sun never sets on the British Empire. "This famous quote is often used to show the large number of territories that Britain had all over the world during the seventeenth to the middle of the twentieth century. By extension, this also shows the scope of its influencel. The first of this set of three documents is the opening speech to the 2012 Olympic Games given by Academy Award winner film director Danny Boyles under whose direction the whole programme fell. At first sight Boyle’s text seem somewhat unrelated to the Olympics as it seems rather like a tribute to Britain and we get the impression that he was on a mission of patriotism lauding Britain as a great country.

However, to put this speech into perspective it may be worthwhile to bear in mind the fact that, as mandated by the Olympic Charter, the formal ceremonial opening of this international sporting event is combined with an artistic spectacle to showcase the host nation’s culture. We can therefore understand the relevance of the contents of this opening speech. In fact, the different sections of the ceremony were designed to reflect aspects of British history and culture.

Document 2 is the 2006 logo of the British Conservatist party. The previous logo of a torch which was used from 1983 until then was abandoned because of its negative association with the party under Margaret Thatcher. The torch emblem logo having been introduced in the Iron Lady’s eighties heyday, David Cameron wanted to distance himself from her. According to the editor of the Conservative Home Website, Tim Montgomery, the green in the logo reinforces what party leader David Cameron is trying to communicate in terms of a more environmentally friendly party. The former logo was therefore replaced by a scribbled drawing of a green and blue oak tree. Document 3 is an excerpt from Stanley…...

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