Between 1547 and 1558 England Was Almost Torn Apart by Religious Revolution. Assess the Validity of This Claim. (45 Marks)

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It is arguable that a religious revolution took place in England between 1547 and 1558, during which time there were two monarchs – Edward VI and Mary I, with opposing religious beliefs. During Tudor England, religious identity was extremely important, and therefore religious ‘revolution’ was going to affect the people, and the country significantly.
Edward VI came to power in 1547, at the age of just nine, and therefore he was assigned a ‘protectorate’ and in the first half of his reign it was his Uncle, the Duke of Somerset. Somerset did himself appear to be Protestant, welcoming religious radicals such as John Hooper and Thomas Becon into his household. He also made a start on reforming religion; in July 1547 he introduced the Book of Homilies and paraphrases, a religious document that had to be placed in every Church. And in December 1547 the Act of Six Articles was repealed, it had been a document that re-established Catholic Doctrines. All of these policies were reforming religion and moving towards the Protestant way of running the Church, and Edward hoped that the introduction of Protestant readings, for example the Cranmer’s first prayer book in 1548, would lead people to begin to convert to Protestantism.
After Somerset fell from power, religious revolution progressed further under John Dudley, the Duke of Northumberland. Despite originally being more conservative himself, and supporting that side of the Privy Council, he understood the need for religious reform under Edward and in 1550 all conservatives and Catholic Bishops, such as Gardiner, were removed from the Privy Council. He furthered Protestantism through the introduction of the Second Book of Common Prayer in 1552, another Protestant document written by Cranmer, which resulted in the removal of mass. Additionally in April 1552 the Second Act of Uniformity was introduced, which enforced all…...

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