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Apply Aristotle Doctrine of the Mean in Contemporary Society

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Apply Aristotle Doctrine of the Mean in Contemporary Society
Introduction
Aristotle aims at achieving flourishing happiness throughout life. This explains the reason why Aristotle holds that; happiness can be achieved when everybody embraces virtues, According to Aristotle virtues involves a mean of two evils. This is explained under the Doctrine of the mean. The doctrine of the mean connects to Eudaimonia, and experiences some elements of success and failure in contemporary society.
Application of The Doctrine of the mean
The Eudoimonia was derived from Greek, and can be translated into varied terms. These terms are aimed at defining prosperity and success in life. The term is a noun, which forms its roots from a combination of the well and evil words in Greek. Examination of the word structure explains the reason why the word can be derived into varied definition. The literal definition of the words is “well-spirit.” This definition is quite unclear to its best. However, the definition of Aristotle is commonly used to ensure standard definition of the term (Curzer 56).
Aristotle holds that Eudaimonia involves a synergy, which comprises of both well acting and well feeling. This means that; an individual can only act well when he or she feels well. The idea behind Eudaimonia is concerned with a good feeling derived from acting well. This feeling can be attained when an individual experiences a warm glow. Contrarily, Aristotle is not a Hedonist, because he does not link happiness to pleasure. However, Aristotle ties happiness to good acts. Additionally, it remains clear that Aristotle clearly supported material wealth (Koehn 180).
Curzer (80) argues that; happiness is usually seconded by external goods as it remains difficult to perform noble acts without the required resources. Additionally, Aristotle links Eudemonia with satisfaction. This is because Aristotle sees satisfaction as a valuable effort toward the achievement of Eudaimonia. Most of Aristotarian philosophies make use of Eudaimonia concept. This is supported by the reasoning where Aristotle holds that it is the most valuable aim in humanity. It is sometimes called the telos required in human conduct. Most of the times, when the ends are far apart from the activities, it remains valuable for the products’ nature to form better features than the case in activity. In Greece virtues are termed as Arete. Aristotle used virtues throughout the ethics of Nicomachean. This concept is used to measure how a given strategy fulfills the specified need. Achievement of a high measure is specifically referred to as the Ergon. The measure of Ergon is applicable to both human beings and animals alike.
An example is in the case of a person who digs ditches. There are people who dig ditches well, and at the same time there are ditch diggers who do not dig the ditch well. Similarly, there could be other situations where the person who is entitled to dig a ditch does the work averagely. Using the concept of Arete and Ergos, the person who does not dig a ditch well can be seen as a person who does not have the Arete. This is because they lack the skills required to dig the ditch well. On the other hand, an Arete is a ditch digger who has the required skills and capabilities of digging a ditch well. Therefore, such a person can be said to have fulfilled their Ergon (Koehn 182).
A person who has moral excellence is referred to a righteous or even a good person. An example of an individual with moral excellence is an individual with the virtue of patience. Women can be categorized as righteous when they have the virtue of chastity. A particularly good and efficient virtue is good, advantageous, planned, practical, and of a beneficial quality. Christians also have their own virtues which include the fifth of the ninth order on the angels in medieval angelology. Virtue refers to an Arete that does not apply in the same way as people may translate it (Koehn 183).
Morals translation originates from the religious beliefs of an individual. It would be quite absurd for an individual who uses modern English to use virtue to explain a given object. This is because the word might not make sense given the English understanding of the word. The word in English refers to the human characteristics rather than features of an object. The definition of the word virtue based from the meaning that Aristotle attaches to it implies that anything can be referred to as a virtue. Therefore an individual can refer to an object as virtuous just because it accomplishes its intended purpose. This means that the words can either be used to refer to animals and objects. Therefore objects that satisfy their roles can be referred to as the Aretes as; they satisfy the definition (Koehn 186).

Aristotle views moral virtues as one in the two types of the virtues in human. The political, social, and moral virtues are collectively referred to as the moral virtues. Additionally, there are other groups of virtues referred to as the intellectual virtues. Intellectual virtues refers relates to contemplations, thoughts, mind, and philosophy. Further, there are virtues used to discern real world organizations, which include the political related groups, religious groups, and social groups among other groups. The main point to remember under these divisions is the understanding that; Aristotle attaches a strong belief to socialization between people. This is because good relations between people ensure understanding (Curzer 98).
Conclusion
In his view, Aristotle holds that virtue can be explained as a mean that separates defects from excess. This separates the good virtues from the extreme measures. This is referred to as the Doctrine of the mean, which is intended to bring about Eudaimonia. This Doctrine is needed when defining the virtues present in a specified person. Consequently, this results into an Arete, which is required in order to achieve Eudaimonia. This leads to a constant step that leads to a real path. It is not surprising that Aristotle as a man concentrated in precision in the activities that he undertook. Usually, an educated man looks for precision in every class of things as long as the precision will be accommodated by the mature of the subject.…...

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