Anatomy

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Submitted By loosa216
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Name ___________________________________ October 20, 2010 _____/27_____%
Lecture Quiz 3A
1. Which is CORRECT about tissues of the body?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Skeletal muscles line hollow organs of the body.
Nervous tissue is the only tissue type that can produce action potentials.
Epithelial tissue is found in all body surfaces.
Connective tissue has a ground substance and lipid fibers.
All of the above.

2. Which BEST defines the term tissues?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

A group of identical cells that perform a common function.
A group of similar cells that perform a complex function.
A group of different cells that perform a unique function.
A group of similar cells that perform a common function.
None of the above.

3. Which is FALSE about epithelial tissues?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Epithelial tissues have an apical side also known as the free side.
Epithelial tissues have a basement membrane.
Epithelial tissue are innervated.
Epithelial tissues have blood vessels.
Epithelial tissues have cell junctions.

4. Which is FALSE about the basement membrane?
A.
C.
D.
E.

It secures and anchors epithelial cells.
B. It is non-living (no cells).
It is divided into an outer reticular lamina and inner basal lamina.
Areolar connective tissue is usually found on the bound side.
It acts as a selective filter.

5. Microvilli are finger-like projects of the plasma membrane that increase surface area. Which side of an epithelial cell would you predict it to be located?
A. Apical.

B. Basal.

C. Intracellular.

D. Lateral.

E. None of the above.

6. Which BEST explains the concept that pseudostratified epithelium is actually a simple type of epithelium?
A.
B.
D.
E.

It appears as one cell layer when the epithelium is stretched.
There are two cell layers.
C. All the cells contact the basement membrane.
Most epithelium with columnar…...

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