Anatomy of a Frog

In: Science

Submitted By MsClay
Words 1278
Pages 6
Summary of the Anatomy of the Frog

As in other higher vertebrates, the frog body may be divided into a head, a short neck, and a trunk. The flat head contains the brain, mouth, eyes, ears, and nose. A short, almost rigid neck permits only limited head movement. The stubby trunk forms walls for a single body cavity, the coelom (Anatomy of the Frog).
All the frog's internal organs--including the heart, the lungs, and all organs of digestion--are held in this single hollow space (Anatomy of the Frog).
The Skeleton and Muscles
The frog's body is supported and protected by a bony framework called the skeleton. The skull is flat, except for an expanded area that encases the small brain. Only nine vertebrae make up the frog's backbone, or vertebral column. The human backbone has 24 vertebrae. The frog has no ribs (Anatomy of the Frog).
The frog does not have a tail. Only a spike like bone, the urostyle, remains as evidence that primitive frogs probably had tails. The urostyle, or "tail pillar," is a downward extension of the vertebral column (Anatomy of the Frog).
The shoulders and front legs of the frog are somewhat similar to man's shoulders and arms. The frog has one "forearm" bone, the radio-ulna. Man has two forearm bones, the radius and the ulna. Both frog and man have one "upper arm" bone, the humerus (Anatomy of the Frog).
The hind legs of the frog are highly specialized for leaping. The single "shinbone" is the tibiofibula. Man has two lower leg bones, the tibia and the fibula. In man and in the frog, the femur is the single upper leg (thigh) bone. A third division of the frog's leg consists of two elongated anklebones, or tarsals. These are the astragalus and the calcaneus. The astragalus corresponds to the human talus. The calcaneus in the human skeleton is the heel bone (Anatomy of the Frog).
As in other vertebrates, the frog skeleton is moved by…...

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