Advantages of Direct Democracy

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Advantages of Direct Democracy
The British system of representative government based on parliamentary democracy is limited in the extent that elections are held only every four or five years. Using direct democracy via a system of referendums would reduce this democratic deficit. For example, Since 1997 Labour held referendums in each of their first two terms and we could say that the deficit has been reduced.
- Direct democracy bring government closer to the people at a time when faith in politicians is falling and decision making has become too distant, reducing democracy to an abstract. Voter turnout during referendums is high when the vote is precipitated by a long and sustained debate about the issue, thus showing that the electorate is keen to engage in the political process when it is felt that their vote matters. For example, 81% voted in the referendum on the Good Friday Agreement.
- Direct democracy can be seen as important ways to confer legitimacy upon policy plans, especially if they involve major constitutional change or the introduction of novel ideas. For Example If Britain were to go into war, a direct consultation with the people would be a far more legitimate means of making the decision than a vote in Parliament where a majority of the MPs represent a party that most of the public did not vote for. For example Cameron wanting to send air strikes to Syria, he needs to consult the public and the MP’s before he makes his final decision.
Advantages of Representative Democracy
1. People cannot be expected to have the time or interest to make regular and important decisions. Representative democracy allows for reps with time and expertise to do so.
2. Representatives have roles in educating the public on political issues.
3. Reps ensure the interests of different sections of society are taken into account during political decisions.
4.…...

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