Aboul Scientific Style

In: English and Literature

Submitted By olesya888
Words 624
Pages 3
Scientific Style
Functions
- provides information
- presents exact and relatively complete scientific knowledge
- addresses a relatively small group of professionals well acquainted with the subject
Forms
- primarily written: essays, articles, textbooks, scientific studies
- spoken: presentations, discussions, conferences
- monologue: no feedback, no situational context, no paralinguistic features
Substyles
- the style of exact science: more impersonal
- the style of humanities: closer to the publicistic style, also shares features with the literary style
General Characteristics
- matter-of-fact, clear, explicit; unambiguous, precise; concise, brevet
- stereotypical in terms of both lexicology and syntax
- impersonal, objective, suppresses the personality of the author
- logical hierarchy within the text: introduction, argument, conclusion and résumé
- quotations and references to other texts
- highly nominal character
- diagrams, charts, sketches, illustrations
Morphological Features
- present tense: timeless validity of the proposition
Syntactical Features
- neutral word-order, no marked word-order
- mostly declarative sentences
- sentence condensers /participles, infinitives, gerunds/ and semi-clausal structures
- no ellipsis, no omission of ‘that’ and ‘which’ in relative clauses
- impersonal passive constructions /‘it should be pointed out that…; it has been found out that…; it has previously been shown that…’/
- active construction with the authorial pronoun ‘we’ /‘we deduce, observe, define, obtain, assume, note’/
Causative constructions
- ‘make/render N ADJ’ /‘this makes the problem easy; this renders the metal hard’/
- ‘enable, allow, permit, cause, make INF’ /‘safety valves allow the metal to cool slowly’/
Theme /topic/ > rheme /focus/
- ‘there’ constructions /‘there is, seems, appears, stands, lives, lies’/
- clefts for…...

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